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Iran issues arrest warrant for Trump, asks Interpol to help |NationalTribune.com

Iran has issued an arrest warrant and asked Interpol for help in detaining US President Donald Trump and dozens of others it believes carried out the drone strike that killed a top Iranian general in Baghdad. Tehran prosecutor Ali Alqasimehr said on Monday that Trump, along with more than 30 others Iran accuses of involvement…

Iran issues arrest warrant for Trump, asks Interpol to help |NationalTribune.com

Iran has issued an arrest warrant and asked Interpol for help in detaining US President Donald Trump and dozens of others it believes carried out the drone strike that killed a top Iranian general in Baghdad.
Tehran prosecutor Ali Alqasimehr said on Monday that Trump, along with more than 30 others Iran accuses of involvement in the January 3 attack that killed General Qassem Soleimani, face “murder and terrorism charges”, the semi-official ISNA news agency reported.
Alqasimehr did not identify anyone else sought other than Trump, but stressed Iran would continue to pursue his prosecution even after his presidency ends.
Interpol, based in Lyon, France,  said in a statement that its constitution forbade it to undertake “any intervention or activities of a political, military, religious or racial character”.
“Therefore, if or when any such requests were to be sent to the General Secretariat,” it added, “… Interpol would not consider requests of this nature.”
The US’s Iran envoy Brian Hook described the move as a “propaganda stunt”.
“Our assessment is that Interpol does not intervene and issue Red Notices that are based on a political nature,” Hook said at a news conference in Saudi Arabia.
“This is a political nature. This has nothing to do with national security, international peace or promoting stability … It is a propaganda stunt that no-one takes seriously,” he said.

Iran to execute alleged ‘CIA spy’ involved in Soleimani’s killing

Red notice request
Alqasimehr was also quoted as saying Iran had requested a “red notice” be put out for Trump and the others, the highest-level notice issued by Interpol, requesting that seeks the location and arrest of the individual named.
Under a red notice, local authorities make the arrests on behalf of the country that requested it. The notices cannot force countries to arrest or extradite suspects, but can put government leaders on the spot and limit suspects’ travel.
After receiving a request, Interpol meets by committee and discusses whether or not to share the information with its member states. Interpol has no requirement for making any of the notices public, though some do get published on its website.
The US killed General Soleimani, who oversaw the Revolutionary Guard Corps’s expeditionary Quds Force, and others in the January attack near Baghdad International Airport.
The assassination came after months of incidents raising tensions between the two countries and ultimately saw Iran retaliate with a ballistic missile strike targeting American troops in Iraq.

The Soleimani Assassination | Start Here

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arrest

US denounces arrest of Hong Kong media mogul |NationalTribune.com

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has denounced China for the arrest of Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai, who he called a “patriot”, and said the move indicated that Beijing is unlikely to change its position on the financial hub. Lai’s arrest under a sweeping new security law comes amid Beijing’s crackdown against pro-democracy…

US denounces arrest of Hong Kong media mogul |NationalTribune.com

US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo has denounced China for the arrest of Hong Kong media tycoon Jimmy Lai, who he called a “patriot”, and said the move indicated that Beijing is unlikely to change its position on the financial hub.
Lai’s arrest under a sweeping new security law comes amid Beijing’s crackdown against pro-democracy opposition in the city and further stokes concerns about media and other freedoms promised when it returned to China in 1997.
China imposed the law on Hong Kong on June 30, drawing condemnation from Western countries.
“Lai was nothing more than a patriot who wanted good things for the people of Hong Kong,” Pompeo told the Conservative Political Action Conference.
“I’m not optimistic given what we saw this morning … that they’re going to change what they’re doing,” he added, referring to the Chinese government.
Aside from Lai, two of his sides were also arrested, as well as a freelance television producer and a member of the pro-democracy movement, Agnes Chow. Lai’s media company, including his newspaper, Apple Daily, was also raided.

Tensions between the world’s top two economies have been increasing daily.
Later on Monday, Pompeo took a fresh swipe at Chinese-owned video-sharing app TikTok, repeating that it presented a national security threat to Americans due to what he said was the obligation of all such companies to the Chinese Communist Party.
“The United States is aware that these companies are being used for China’s national security purposes,” Pompeo said in an interview on Newsmax, without offering concrete evidence of such use.
President Donald Trump has unveiled sweeping bans on US transactions with the Chinese owners of TikTok and messaging app WeChat.
Pompeo said the US would take action to ensure that Hong Kong is treated as an extension of China after Beijing passed its national security legislation in June, prompting Washington to end the territory’s special status.
He said he feared that Hong Kong might have had its last democratic election, in an apparent reference to 2019’s lower-level district council elections.
Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam last month postponed a September 6 election for seats in the city legislature for a year because of a spike in novel coronavirus cases. The US said it was the latest example of Beijing undermining democracy in the territory.
Since then, Lam and several Hong Kong officials have been targeted with US sanctions. In response, China slapped sanctions against US officials, including two senators: Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz.
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Hong Kong ‘issues arrest warrants’ for exiled democracy activists |NationalTribune.com

Police in Hong Kong has ordered the arrest of several pro-democracy activists living in exile on suspicion of violating a China-imposed national security law, according to Chinese state media. CCTV said late on Friday the six are wanted on suspicion of secession or colluding with foreign forces, crimes the new law punishes with up to…

Hong Kong ‘issues arrest warrants’ for exiled democracy activists |NationalTribune.com

Police in Hong Kong has ordered the arrest of several pro-democracy activists living in exile on suspicion of violating a China-imposed national security law, according to Chinese state media.
CCTV said late on Friday the six are wanted on suspicion of secession or colluding with foreign forces, crimes the new law punishes with up to life in prison.
It named them as Nathan Law, Wayne Chan Ka-kui, Honcques Laus, Simon Cheng and Ray Wong Toi-yeung. Samuel Chu, an American citizen living in the United States, was also on the list.
Hong Kong police declined to comment.
The arrest warrants mark the first time the city’s police have used the extraterritorial power in the new law to go after activists who are not in the semi-autonomous Chinese territory. 

Chu, speaking to Al Jazeera from the US city of Los Angeles, described warrant for his arrest as “outrageous” and said it showed “how desperate and how scared” China is of international pressure. 
“It’s such an outlandish claim that they somehow have jurisdiction over an American citizen lobbying the American government,” said Chu, who runs the Washington, DC-based advocacy group, Hong Kong Democracy Council. 
“The kind of global bullying and censorship, not only of citizens of other countries, but businesses … its starting to create a united front line, globally, pushing back,” Chu said, adding: “Today’s move, particularly, shows they are scared of losing control. They know that if Hong Kong can continue to be a place of resistance, it threatens their control all over the mainland.”
‘Absurdity’
Nathan Law, a former Hong Kong legislator who is currently in the United Kingdom, called the charges “trumped-up” and said his only crime was that he “loves Hong Kong too much”. 
He said on Facebook the “wanted bulletins”, recent arrests, and mass disqualifications of pro-democracy activists from a now-delayed election are “indications of our need to remain active on the global stage”.
“That Hong Kong has no place for even such moderate views like ours underscores the absurdity of Chinese Communist rule.”
China imposed the contentious law on its self-governing territory on June 30, circumventing the local legislature, in a move condemned by some Western governments, rights groups and activists in the territory.
Critics of the law fear it will crush freedoms in a city that is a world financial hub, prompting some to flee overseas. But supporters say the security legislation is needed to restore stability and order to the former British colony after a year of sometimes violent anti-government protests.

Al Jazeera’s Divya Gopalan, reporting from Hong Kong, said the arrest warrants on Friday was a strategic move by China. 
“Basically, Beijing is trying to drum up grassroots support. They are recovering from the coronavirus pandemic and one of the main nationalistic areas of support is tightening its grip on Hong Kong. So its sending a very clear message that it has control over Hong Kong people, no matter where they are,” she said.
“And on top of that, it’s sending a message to the international community,” Gopalan added. “One of the main tenets of this national security law was that it has no borders. No matter where you are, who you are, whether you are from Hong Kong or not, you could break this law. And China by showing how long its reach could be, its sending another message to those countries like the US, UK, Australia and Canada that had condemned the implementation of this national security law.”
Elections postponed
In just a month since the legislation came into effect, a dozen leading pro-democracy campaigners have been disqualified from running in legislative elections and four students have been arrested on suspicion of “inciting succession” with social media posts.
Several countries have since suspended their extradition treaties with Hong Kong, including the UK, Australia, Canada and most recently Germany, as a possible safeguard against attempts to use the national security laws to round up activists abroad.
“We have repeatedly made our expectation clear that China lives up to its legal responsibilities under international law,” German Foreign Minister Heiko Maas said on Friday just after Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam postponed the city’s legislative election by a year.
The vote was initially scheduled to take place in September, but Lam said a delay was “essential” to control the city’s worsening coronavirus outbreak.
But critics accused the government of using the disease outbreak as an excuse, with Emily Lau, a senior member of the opposition Democratic Party saying authorities were delaying the vote “because they are afraid they would lose” the election. 
“Who is she [Lam] trying to fool?” Lau told Al Jazeera. “I think it’s quite laughable.” 
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Iran issues arrest warrant for President Trump

Iran on Monday issued an “arrest warrant” for President Trump and more than 30 other foreign officials for their role in the January killing of top Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, according to the country’s Fars News Agency. Iranian officials said “red alerts” already have been issued for Mr. Trump and 35 other officials and that…

Iran issues arrest warrant for President Trump

Iran on Monday issued an “arrest warrant” for President Trump and more than 30 other foreign officials for their role in the January killing of top Iranian Gen. Qassem Soleimani, according to the country’s Fars News Agency.

Iranian officials said “red alerts” already have been issued for Mr. Trump and 35 other officials and that Tehran is seeking the help of Interpol to apprehend them. Iran did not name the other 35 officials but said that Mr. Trump “stands at the top of the list and will be prosecuted” as soon as he leaves office.

“Thirty-six individuals who have been involved or ordered the assassination of Hajj Qassem, including the political and military officials of the U.S. and other governments, have been identified and arrest warrants have been issued for them by the judiciary officials and red alerts have also been issued for them via the Interpol,” Tehran’s Prosecutor-General Ali Alqasi Meh said, as quoted by Fars.

Mr. Trump and the 35 others, Iranian officials said, stand accused of “murder and terrorist action.”

The Iranian threats and arrest warrant carry with them no actual danger for Mr. Trump. Iran could only arrest the president if he steps foot on Iranian soil — a virtual impossibility given the lack of formal diplomatic relations between the two countries.

Furthermore, Interpol said Monday morning it would not act on Iran’s request to apprehend Mr. Trump, meaning the president will face no danger of arrest when he travels abroad.

On Jan. 3, the U.S. launched an airstrike near Baghdad International Airport that killed Soleimani, the leader of Iran’s powerful Quds Force, a unit of the country’s Revolutionary Guard Corps.

The Trump administration blamed Soleimani for coordinating attacks by Iranian-backed militias in Iraq against American troops and U.S. contractors.

The highly controversial move nearly sparked an all-out war between the U.S. and Iran. Days after the incident, Iran sought to avenge the Soleimani strike by launching missiles at U.S. forces stationed at Iraq’s al-Asad Air Base.

Dozens of American service members suffered traumatic brain injuries during the assault but none were killed.

Mr. Trump decided against direct retaliation for that attack.

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