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President Trump and all the boomerang lies

ANALYSIS/OPINION: Brace for the fight of your life. The biggest difference between today and four years ago is that this time they know Donald Trump can win. Sure, it was ugly last time. They despised him, because they despise you. They wanted to destroy him, because they don’t care about you. They told endless lies…

President Trump and all the boomerang lies

ANALYSIS/OPINION:

Brace for the fight of your life.

The biggest difference between today and four years ago is that this time they know Donald Trump can win.

Sure, it was ugly last time. They despised him, because they despise you. They wanted to destroy him, because they don’t care about you. They told endless lies about him because they are fundamentally dishonest people incapable of arguing about the vital issues Mr. Trump built his campaign around.

But honestly, none of them in 2016 ever thought he could win. Until he did.

Still, they maligned him and lied about him and smeared him in hopes of tarnishing all who supported him. It was a way of punishing the so-called “forgotten voters” who for the first time in decades had a leading politician speaking for them on the issues about which they cared the most.

They hated him also because he stole the Republican Party from the limp-fisted, trained eunuchs who had taken over the supposedly “conservative” party in Washington for so long. You know, the ones who supported throwing open the borders, sending our boys to die in faraway lands defending other people’s borders, and jumping into bed with communist China.

These sad losers believed that the only way to beat Democrats was by out-surrendering Democrats. Remember when George W. Bush desperately sucked up to Ted Kennedy by federalizing public education in America?

You watch, it is only a matter of time before some ridiculous GOP bozo like Sen. Mitt Romney declares it is time to defund the police. Forget kneeling on the Senate floor, Mittens. You should just lie down completely prone on your belly — all the better for Democrats to walk all over you and scrape the dung off their shoes onto the back of your perfectly-coifed hair helmet.

It is true, these people threw everything they had at Mr. Trump in 2016. They lied about him relentlessly. They blamed him for every ill known to man. But that was a tame, little mutton race compared to what these people will do to Mr. Trump this time — now that they know he can win.

It’s not like Mr. Trump doesn’t give his enemies plenty to criticize, plenty to shoot at. He does. Every day.

But for them, it is never enough. Which is why they are forever claiming he said things he never said or accusing him of doing things he never did and weaving these fantastic, bizarre conspiracy theories about Vladimir Putin and hookers in a Moscow hotel room.

Just last week, they claimed he said that George Floyd, after his horrifying death in police custody, was gazing down from Heaven marveling over Mr. Trump’s epic economy.

“Trump says Jobs Report Made It a ‘Great Day’ for George Floyd,” reported The New York Times. “Trump invokes George Floyd’s name while taking economic victory lap,” wrote CNN.

Neither CNN nor anyone else who excoriated Mr. Trump included the actual quote of what Mr. Trump said, since doing that would have revealed that, indeed, they were lying again.

“Equal justice under the law must mean that every American receives equal treatment in every encounter with law enforcement regardless of race, color, gender or creed,” he said, echoing the calls for justice in the streets. “They have to receive fair treatment from law enforcement. They have to receive it. We all saw what happened last week. We can’t let that happen.”

Mr. Trump was, in fact, applauding the peaceful protesters.

“Hopefully, George is looking down right now and saying, ‘This is a great day that’s happening for our country,’” he went on, clearly referring to those protests that have been peaceful.

But these are the same liars who claim he called all Mexicans rapists. They are the same liars who claim he did not condemn white supremacists in Charlottesville. They are the same liars who have peddled all the fairytale Russia conspiracies.

The only silver lining here is that while it is true that lies travel faster and farther than the truth, the same people who tell the same lies over and over and over again eventually lose all credibility. And when those lies become increasingly ridiculous and unhinged from reality, the more quickly they become discounted.

Consider just this year. Mr. Trump has resisted an impeachment bid constructed entirely of crazed lies. He has withstood a global pandemic in which more than 100,000 Americans have died so far. He has overseen the greatest economic collapse in American history. And now, riots in the streets.

It is only June.

At some point, these liars blaming Mr. Trump says far more about them than it ever will about him.

• Charles Hurt is opinion editor of The Washington Times. He can be reached at [email protected] or @charleshurt on Twitter.

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President

President Trump Announces Nominee for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

President Trump Announces Nominee for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States – YouTube

President Trump Announces Nominee for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States

President Trump Announces Nominee for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States – YouTube

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Belarus

Belarus president closes western borders, puts army on high alert |NationalTribune.com

Belarus’s president, beleaguered by six weeks of mass protests demanding his resignation, has announced he is putting troops on high alert and closing the country’s borders with Poland and Lithuania. President Alexander Lukashenko’s decision on Thursday underlined his repeated claim that the wave of protests is driven by the West. He faces increasing criticism from…

Belarus president closes western borders, puts army on high alert |NationalTribune.com

Belarus’s president, beleaguered by six weeks of mass protests demanding his resignation, has announced he is putting troops on high alert and closing the country’s borders with Poland and Lithuania.
President Alexander Lukashenko’s decision on Thursday underlined his repeated claim that the wave of protests is driven by the West. He faces increasing criticism from the United States and the European Union.
Protests began after the disputed August 9 presidential election. Official results gave the authoritarian leader a sixth term in office but opponents say the results were manipulated.
“We are forced to withdraw troops from the streets, put the army on high alert and close the state border on the west, primarily with Lithuania and Poland,” Lukashenko said at a women’s forum.
Lukashenko also said Belarus’s border with Ukraine would be strengthened.
“I don’t want my country to be at war. Moreover, I don’t want Belarus and Poland, Lithuania to turn into a theatre of military operations where our issues will not be resolved,” he said.
“Therefore, today in front of this hall of the most beautiful, advanced, patriotic people I want to appeal to the peoples of Lithuania, Poland and Ukraine – stop your crazy politicians, don’t let war break out!”
He did not mention neighbouring Latvia, which like Poland and Lithuania is a NATO member.

Identifying officers allegedly involved in violence
Earlier on Thursday, Svetlana Tikhanovskaya, the main opposition candidate in the disputed presidential election, said activists are compiling a list of law enforcement officers who were allegedly involved in violence against protesters denouncing the results of the vote.
Nearly 7,000 people were detained and hundreds were brutally beaten by police during the first several days of post-election protests.
Human rights groups are working with opposition activists to identify the officers and officials, Tikhanovskaya said, adding the list will be shared with the US, the EU and Russia.
Tikhanovskaya, who left for Lithuania in the wake of the election under pressure from Belarusian authorities, said the opposition will name the list in honour of Alexander Taraikovsky, a protester who died in Minsk the day after the election as police dispersed peaceful demonstrators.
Authorities initially said an explosive device Taraikovsky intended to throw at police blew up in his hands and killed him. However, a video by The Associated Press news agency showed he was not holding any explosives when he fell to the ground, his shirt bloodied.

‘A hostage to conventional cliches’
The US and the EU have criticised the presidential election as neither free nor fair, and urged Lukashenko to start talks with the opposition – a call he has rejected.
Washington and Brussels have been pondering sanctions against Belarusian officials for alleged vote-rigging and the violent response to protests.
On Thursday, the European Parliament overwhelmingly passed a resolution rejecting the official election results and saying it would not recognise Lukashenko as the legitimate president once his current term expires on November 5.
Belarus’s foreign ministry responded strongly, saying: “We are disappointed that the European Parliament, positioning itself as a serious, objective and democratic structure, could not find the political will to look beyond its nose, overcome one-sidedness and not become a hostage to conventional cliches.”
Russia, Lukashenko’s main ally and sponsor, has maintained staunch support for the Belarusian leader.
Moscow announced this week it would offer a new $1.5bn loan to his government.
Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said on Friday during a trip to Lithuania the two countries – both Belarus’s neighbours – will continue to offer medical and material assistance to Belarusians who were hurt and persecuted during the protests.
He argued the EU and international lenders should offer at least one billion euros ($1.18bn) in economic support for Belarus and its businesses.
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Lebanon president accepts gov’t resignation after Beirut blast |NationalTribune.com

Lebanon’s government has stepped down as Prime Minister Hassan Diab blamed endemic corruption for a devastating explosion last week that tore through the capital. President Michel Aoun accepted Diab’s resignation on Monday and asked the government to stay on in a caretaker capacity until a new cabinet was formed. Tensions have been boiling over in the…

Lebanon president accepts gov’t resignation after Beirut blast |NationalTribune.com

Lebanon’s government has stepped down as Prime Minister Hassan Diab blamed endemic corruption for a devastating explosion last week that tore through the capital.
President Michel Aoun accepted Diab’s resignation on Monday and asked the government to stay on in a caretaker capacity until a new cabinet was formed.
Tensions have been boiling over in the country following the massive explosion at Beirut’s port that killed some 200 people and wounded 6,000 others, according to the latest tally. 
“This crime” was a result of corruption that is “bigger than the state”, Diab said in a televised statement, adding that he was taking “a step back” so he could stand with the people “and fight the battle for change alongside them”.

“I declare today the resignation of this government. May God protect Lebanon,” Diab said, repeating the last phrase three times.
The developments follow a weekend of angry, violent anti-establishment protests in which 728 people were wounded and one police officer killed amid a heavy crackdown by security forces.
Through analysis of videos and images of the security response by the army and men in plain-clothes on the day, and examination of medical documents and interviews with doctors who treated the wounded, Al Jazeera established that security forces violated international standards on the use of force.
Political and economic reforms
The August 4 disaster, which was caused by highly explosive ammonium nitrate that was stored at Beirut’s port for more than six years, has fuelled popular anger and upended politics in a country already struggling with a major economic crisis.
Most Lebanese blame their leadership’s corruption and neglect for the explosion, which has caused damage to the extent of an estimated $15bn and left nearly 300,000 people homeless.
Since October, there have been mass demonstrations demanding the departure of the entire sectarian-based leadership over entrenched corruption, incompetence and mismanagement.
But the ruling oligarchy has held onto power for so long – since the end of the civil war in 1990 – that it is difficult to find a credible political figure not tainted by connections to them.
Although Diab’s resignation had appeared inevitable after the catastrophe, he seemed unwilling to leave and only two days ago made a televised speech in which he offered to stay on for two months to allow for various factions to agree on a road map for reforms. But the pressure from within his cabinet proved to be too much.
‘Historic turning point’

Diab’s government was formed after his predecessor, Saad Hariri, stepped down under pressure from the protest movement. It took months of bickering among the leadership factions before they settled on Diab. 
His government, which was supported by Hezbollah and its allies and seen as one-sided, failed to implement the sweeping political and economic reforms that it had promised. 
Now the process must start again, with Diab’s government in a caretaker role as the same factions debate a new one. 
Al Jazeera’s Bernard Smith, reporting from Beirut, said the change is going to be challenging because Lebanon’s electoral system is set up “to protect the political elite in the country”.
“To change that system, those political elites have to agree to it,” Smith said.
“Even an explosion as catastrophic as Tuesday’s might not be enough to get those elites easily give up their grip on power … That’s why international pressure, people believe, is necessary.”
On Sunday, world leaders and international organisations pledged nearly $300m in emergency humanitarian aid to Beirut, but warned no funds would be made available until Lebanese authorities committed themselves to the political and economic reforms demanded by the people.
Rami Khouri, a professor at the American University of Beirut, described the developments of the past week as “a historic turning point in the modern political governance of Lebanon” that is “just at the beginning”.
Khouri said there were essentially two main forces currently in Lebanon: “One is Hezbollah and its close allies, and the other one is the protest movement, or the revolution as they call themselves – these are all kinds of people but they do represent the majority of the population.”
“The question is, will there be a serious negotiation now,” he said, noting that the formation of “a hybrid government” tasked to address Lebanon’s critical issues was likely.
“They will have to agree on whether the transitional government that comes in is a serious reformist government, with ‘clean’ and efficient people that can get the support of the international community and do a quick deal with the IMF.”
Meanwhile, Habib Battah, a Lebanon-based journalist, questioned how long the caretaker government would remain in place since it is “very difficult” to form a government in Lebanon.
“The Diab government was many months in the making,” Battah said.
He said while the resignation could be seen as a victory for the protesters who view the government as a “corrupt system”, it is important to note that others benefit from it. 
Political parties control schools and hospitals, among other things across the country.
“These parties are really tough to compete against in elections,” Battah said, adding that it was up to the international community to stop supporting these parties if it were serious about helping Lebanon.
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