Connect with us

signs

Trump signs executive order on policing, urges nation to find ‘common ground’

President Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday aimed at reducing fatal encounters between police and minorities, after the nationwide outcry and violent protests over police brutality in the deaths of George Floyd and others. “Though we may all come from different places and different backgrounds, we’re united by our desire to ensure peace, dignity…

Trump signs executive order on policing, urges nation to find ‘common ground’

President Trump signed an executive order on Tuesday aimed at reducing fatal encounters between police and minorities, after the nationwide outcry and violent protests over police brutality in the deaths of George Floyd and others.

“Though we may all come from different places and different backgrounds, we’re united by our desire to ensure peace, dignity and equality for all Americans,” Mr. Trump said in the White House Rose Garden. “We have to find common ground.”

The action, among other steps, bans police “choke-holds” unless an officer’s life is in danger. As the president signed the order, he was flanked by the leaders of several national law-enforcement groups.

Mr. Trump injected the presidential campaign into his announcement, declaring that “President Obama and Vice President Biden never even tried to fix this during their eight-year period.” Mr. Obama convened a task force on policing during the emergence of the Black Lives Matters movement to address similar tensions, but the panel’s recommendations were largely ignored by police departments nationwide.

Before the announcement, Mr. Trump met with families of several people who died in encounters with police, including Ahmaud Arbery of Georgia, who was shot and killed by a white resident as he jogged through a neighborhood earlier this year.

He told the families, “Your loved ones will not have died in vain.”

But Mr. Trump reiterated that he vehemently disagrees with a movement by some Democrats to defund police departments in the wake of the tragedies. He said the nation doesn’t need “more stoking of fears and division.”

“Americans know the truth without police — there is chaos without law, there is anarchy, and without safety there is catastrophe,” the president said. “We need to bring law enforcement and communities closer together, not to drive them apart. Violence and destruction will not be tolerated.”

The order encourages police departments to adopt best practices in de-escalating confrontations with suspects, establishes a system for sharing information to track officers who have repeated complaints against them for excessive force, and and creates federal incentives for police departments to deploy social workers on issues like mental health and addiction.

The president said a strong economic recovery from the coronavirus shutdowns “is probably the best thing we can do to help the black, Hispanic and Asian communities.” He noted that retail sales jumped a largest-ever 17.7% in May, calling it “a great thing, because ultimately it’s about jobs.”

“Unless my formula is tampered with, we will soon be in a stronger position than we were before the plague came in from China,” the president said. “We’re way ahead of schedule.”

He also recounted his administration’s achievements for blacks, including record levels of funding for Historically Black Colleges and Universities.

Sign up for Daily Newsletters

Continue Reading…

firing

‘Signs of life’ under Beirut rubble one month since explosion |NationalTribune.com

Beirut, Lebanon – A Chilean rescue team said it detected signs of life underneath the rubble of a building that collapsed in the massive explosion that tore through Beirut one month ago. A member of the TOPOS CHILE rescue team told Al Jazeera that, using a scanning machine, it discovered signs of a pulse and…

‘Signs of life’ under Beirut rubble one month since explosion |NationalTribune.com

Beirut, Lebanon – A Chilean rescue team said it detected signs of life underneath the rubble of a building that collapsed in the massive explosion that tore through Beirut one month ago.
A member of the TOPOS CHILE rescue team told Al Jazeera that, using a scanning machine, it discovered signs of a pulse and breathing near the ground floor of the collapsed building.
He said it most likely belonged to a child, adding that the team also found the presence of at least one body.
The August 4 explosion, that killed 191 people and injured more than 6,000, destroyed much of Lebanon’s capital.
The Chilean team had been visiting streets in the capital as part of a mission to secure buildings before the reconstruction phase when one of their search dogs ran towards a building and alerted them of human presence, Akram Nehme, member of the Achrafieh 2020 NGO that helped bring TOPOS CHILE to Beirut, told Al Jazeera.
Edward Bitar, a member of NGO Live Love Lebanon working with TOPOS CHILE in Lebanon, said they had detected 18 breath cycles per minute emanating from under the rubble using the sensor.
“We are trying to keep hopes low. If someone is found, it would be a miracle,” said Bitar.

TOPOS CHILE rescue team member told Al Jazeera that they had discovered signs of a pulse and breathing near the ground floor of the collapsed building using a sensitive scanning machine [Timour Azhari/Al Jazeera]

TOPOS CHILE often heads to disaster zones, including to Japan’s Fukushima region in 2011 when a nuclear reactor exploded.
In 2010, it helped rescue a man in Haiti after he spent 27 days in the rubble caused by an earthquake.
Looking for life
Bitar said the owner of the building had attested to the fact that no one was inside.
But a number of people on the scene said they had alerted security forces of the smell of decomposition emanating from the building in the days after the blast, adding that security forces did not search the rubble.
Official search-and-rescue efforts have long-since been called off.
Thursday’s volunteer-led effort started in the morning and continued into the night. The team removed the rubble of the building – stone by stone – with help from Lebanese climbers, firefighters and civil defence. 

Rescue workers repeatedly silenced the large crowd to enable their sensor to probe for signs of life, leading an eerie silence to fall over the street.
For many Lebanese, Thursday’s volunteer-led efforts are just the latest example of state failure, both in the lead-up to the explosion – caused by 2,750 tonnes of ammonium nitrate haphazardly stored at the Beirut port for almost seven years – and in the explosion’s aftermath.
On Thursday, a month after the explosion, Lebanon’s army announced it found 4.35 tonnes of ammonium nitrate near the entrance to Beirut port.
The military said army experts were called in for an inspection and found the dangerous chemical in four containers stored near the port.
“Honestly this is why we all walk around believing something else is gonna blow us up. Their incompetence is stunning,” Lebanese activist Bissan Fakih said in a tweet, referring to the country’s political class.
Continue Reading…

Continue Reading

firing

Sudan signs peace deal with rebel groups from Darfur |NationalTribune.com

Sudan’s government and the main rebel alliance agreed on a peace deal on Monday to end 17 years of conflict.  The Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF), a coalition of rebel groups from the western region of Darfur and the southern states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile, signed the peace agreement at a ceremony in Juba, capital…

Sudan signs peace deal with rebel groups from Darfur |NationalTribune.com

Sudan’s government and the main rebel alliance agreed on a peace deal on Monday to end 17 years of conflict. 
The Sudan Revolutionary Front (SRF), a coalition of rebel groups from the western region of Darfur and the southern states of South Kordofan and Blue Nile, signed the peace agreement at a ceremony in Juba, capital of neighbouring South Sudan, which has hosted and helped mediate the long-running talks since late 2019.
The final agreement covers key issues around security, land ownership, transitional justice, power sharing, and the return of people who fled their homes because of war.
It also provides for the dismantling of rebel forces and the integration of their fighters into the national army.
The deal is a significant step in the transitional leadership’s goal of resolving multiple, deep-rooted civil conflicts.

Inside Story – Darfur conflict: A rebel leader’s death

About 300,000 people have been killed in Darfur since rebels took up arms there in 2003, according to the United Nations.
Conflict in South Kordofan and Blue Nile erupted in 2011, following unresolved issues from bitter fighting there in Sudan’s 1983-2005 civil war.
Two rebel factions refused to take part in the deal.
Marginalisation 
Leaders of the SRF raised their fists in celebration after signing the agreement.
Sudanese Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok and several ministers flew to Juba on Sunday, the official news agency SUNA reported, where he met South Sudan President Salva Kiir.
Hamdok said finding a deal had taken longer than first hoped after an initial agreement in September 2019.
Both military chief General Abdel Fattah al-Burhan and Hamdok were in attendance on Monday, while Kiir oversaw the ceremony.
The rebel forces took up arms against what they said was the economic and political marginalisation by the government in Khartoum.
They are largely drawn from non-Arab minority groups that long railed against Arab domination of successive governments in Khartoum, including that of toppled strongman, Omar al-Bashir.
The rebel groups that signed the agreement include the Justice and Equality Movement (JEM) and Minni Minawi’s Sudan Liberation Army (SLA), both of the western region of Darfur.
Rebel members of the Sudan Liberation Movement (SLM) and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North (SPLM-N) had provisionally initialled the agreement with the government late on Saturday.However, an SLM faction led by Abdelwahid Nour and a wing of the SPLM-N headed by Abdelaziz al-Hilu refused to take part.
Continue Reading…

Continue Reading

Brazil

Brazil sees signs coronavirus outbreak slowing: Live updates |NationalTribune.com

India, the third worst-affected country in the world, has reported a record number of cases for coronavirus.  Brazil has expressed cautious optimism that the country’s coronavirus outbreak could be about to slow, with cases and deaths on a weekly basis falling from their late July peaks.  Kamala Harris accused US President Donald Trump of a…

Brazil sees signs coronavirus outbreak slowing: Live updates |NationalTribune.com

India, the third worst-affected country in the world, has reported a record number of cases for coronavirus. 
Brazil has expressed cautious optimism that the country’s coronavirus outbreak could be about to slow, with cases and deaths on a weekly basis falling from their late July peaks. 
Kamala Harris accused US President Donald Trump of a “failure of leadership” for his handling of the coronavirus pandemic as she accepted the nomination as vice president.
South Korea has reported a seventh day of triple digit cases with infections growing outside Seoul.
More than 22 million people have been diagnosed with COVID-19 around the world, and more than 14 million have recovered. More than 786,000 people have died, according to data from Johns Hopkins University.
Here are the latest updates:
Thursday, August 20
05:30 GMT – Germany reports highest number of daily cases since April
Germany recorded 1,707 cases of coronavirus in the past 24 hours, the highest since April.
Official figures from the Robert Koch Institute show Germany with a total of 228,621 confirmed cases. An additional ten people died from the disease. 
04:15 GMT – India reports record daily jump in coronavirus cases
India has reported a record jump in coronavirus cases.
The Health Ministry confirmed 69,652 cases on Thursday, and also reported 997 more deaths.
India’s caseload is the third highest in the world after the US and Brazil.
03:50 GMT – Indonesia infection rate highest in Southeast Asia
Indonesia has officially reported 6,346 deaths from COVID-19, the highest toll in Southeast Asia, but Reuters reports that including people who died with acute COVID-19 symptoms but were not tested, the death toll is three times higher.
In a comprehensive report on the situation in the archipelago, the news agency says problems with testing as well as a lack of contact tracing has contributed to the rapid spread of the disease. 
“This virus has already spread all over Indonesia. What we are doing is basically herd immunity,” Prijo Sidipratomo, dean of the Faculty of Medicine at the National Veterans Development University in Jakarta told Reuters. “So, we should just dig many, many graves.”
You can read the story here.
03:30 GMT – China reports fourth day with no local transmission of coronavirus
China has reported its fourth day in a row without any local transmission of coronavirus. The seven cases announced on Thursday were all imported from overseas, according to state media.

— CGTN (@CGTNOfficial) August 20, 2020

03:00 GMT – Australia’s Victoria reports 240 new cases, 13 deaths
The Australian state of Victoria has reported 240 new cases of coronavirus over the past 24 hours, up slightly on the 216 announced on Wednesday.
It also reported 13 deaths.
The state is the epicentre of a new wave of the outbreak in Australia and its capital city, Melbourne, has been locked down with a curfew imposed.

#COVID19VicData for 20 August 2020. 240 new cases of #coronavirus ( #COVID19) were detected in Victoria yesterday. Sadly we report 13 deaths from the virus. More information later today. pic.twitter.com/fiQChvG3Oh
— VicGovDHHS (@VicGovDHHS) August 19, 2020

01:55 GMT  – South Korea reports seventh day of triple digit cases
South Korea has reported its seventh consecutive day of triple digit cases, with the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirming 288 cases – 276 locally acquired – in the past 24 hours.
Many of the cases have been traced to churches in Seoul, but an increasing number are appearing elsewhere in the country including the cities of Busan, Daejeon and Gwangju. 
The largest cluster is linked to the Sarang Jeil Church in northern Seoul.
01:40 GMT – China state media defends Wuhan pool party
China’s state media has come to the defence of a theme park in Wuhan which hosted a massive music festival and pool party over the weekend and raised concern about COVID-19 when pictures and videos were widely shared overseas.
The Global Times said the packed event was a sign of life returning to normal in a city that spent 76 days in lockdown and accused critics of “sour grapes”. The virus first appeared in Wuhan late last year.

Criticizing #Wuhan residents for having fun at water park music festival shows foreign sour grapes. People should reflect on why their countries’ epidemic control failed rather than smear Wuhan people and their hard-won victory over #coronavirus https://t.co/NJVBmxLiHk https://t.co/BRQBJvZtoe
— Global Times (@globaltimesnews) August 19, 2020

VIDEO: 🇨🇳 Crowds packed out a water park over the weekend in the central Chinese city of #Wuhan, where the #coronavirus first emerged late last year, keen to party as the city edges back to normal life pic.twitter.com/SJFBmx5sU8
— AFP news agency (@AFP) August 17, 2020

01:15 GMT – Qantas posts $1.4b loss amid pandemic restructuring
Australian airline Qantas says it had a loss of 1.96 billion Australian dollars ($1.4 billion) in the financial year ended June 30, as a result of restructuring and accounting charges linked to the pandemic.
Chief executive Alan Joyce said business conditions were the worst in the carrier’s 100 year history with international flights suspended and domestic routes hampered by border closures within Australia.
Joyce added that international flights were unlikely to resume until a vaccine was widely available, which might not be until late next year.
00:30 GMT – Harris says Trump ‘failure’ on coronavirus cost US lives
Kamala Harris will accuse US President Donald Trump of a “failure of leadership” during the coronavirus pandemic that has cost countless lives and jobs, when she accepts the Democratic Party’s nomination to be their candidate for vice president at the Democratic National Convention on Wednesday night (US time).
Harris will also attack Trump’s abilities and character, according to excerpts released to news agencies.
Trump’s “incompetence makes us feel afraid [and] the callousness makes us feel alone.”
The US has recorded the most cases and the most deaths from coronavirus of any country in the world. 
You can keep up-to-date with all the developments from the convention, which is being held online, here.

Vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris will accuse incumbent President Donald Trump of a ‘failure of leadership’ when she formally accepts the Democratic Party nomination on Wednesday night (US time) [Carlos Barria/Reuters]

00:15 GMT – Trump touts convalescent plasma as coronavirus treatment
US President Donald Trump is touting the use of convalescent plasma as a treatment for coronavirus, saying he’s “heard fantastic things” about it.
Trump made his comments after the New York Times reported that the Food and Drug Administration had put on hold emergency approval for the treatment because of concerns the data on plasma use was too weak.
The president, who is facing reelection in November, claimed the decision could be political.
“You have a lot of people over there that don’t want to rush things because they want to do it after November 3,” Trump said, referring to the election. 
“I’ve heard numbers way over 50 percent success. And people are dying and we should have it approved if it’s good and I’m hearing it’s good. I hear from people at the FDA it’s good.”
The blood plasma of people who recover from COVID-19 contains antibodies that were created to fight off the infection. It has been used in some countries including China to help other patients battling the disease.
00:00 GMT – Cautious optimism in Brazil as study shows transmission rate below one
Brazil’s Health Ministry says there are signs the coronavirus outbreak in the country – the world’s second-worst – could be about to slow.
The number of confirmed cases dropped to 304,684 last week, compared with a peak of 319,653 in the week ending July 25. The number of deaths reported on a weekly basis has also fallen to 6,755 from a peak of 7,677 in the last week of July. 
A study by Imperial College London also shows Brazil’s transmission rate has fallen below one, according to local media. That means each person diagnosed with the disease will infect fewer than one person, which will slow the outbreak.
“In a way, it is a trend. We have to see how the disease behaves in the next two weeks to see if there is a significant drop,” Arnaldo Medeiros, Secretary of Health Surveillance, told reporters on Wednesday.
Daily figures continue to show a steady rise in cases and deaths with the country registering a total of 3,456,652 cases of the disease and 111,100 deaths.
—-
Hello and welcome to Al Jazeera’s continuing coverage of the coronavirus pandemic. I’m Kate Mayberry in Kuala Lumpur.
Read all the updates from yesterday (August 19) here.

Continue Reading…

Continue Reading

Trending