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A Cop Was Charged With Murder Less Than 24 Hours After a Shooting. Here’s How Rare That Is.

Want the best of VICE News straight to your inbox? Sign up here.When police kill people, they rarely face charges — and when they do, it can take weeks or even months for those charges to come down. But in Prince George’s County, Maryland, that wasn’t the case. On Tuesday evening, police Cpl. Michael Owen…

A Cop Was Charged With Murder Less Than 24 Hours After a Shooting. Here’s How Rare That Is.

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When police kill people, they rarely face charges — and when they do, it can take weeks or even months for those charges to come down.

But in Prince George’s County, Maryland, that wasn’t the case. On Tuesday evening, police Cpl. Michael Owen was taken into custody and charged with murder — less than 24 hours after he shot and killed William Green, a 49-year-old black man who was handcuffed inside a police cruiser.

“What happened last night is a crime,” said Police Chief Henry Stawinski. “There are no circumstances under which this outcome is acceptable.”

Prosecutions and convictions of police officers who kill civilians have increased in recent years, in part thanks to the growing ubiquity of body-worn camera footage that can help investigators determine whether a crime has been committed. But charges are still the exception, not the rule.

Police in America kill between 900 and 1,000 people every year. Since 2005, 109 non-federal law enforcement officers have been charged with murder or manslaughter resulting from an on-duty shooting, and of those, just 41 have been convicted of a crime, according to Phil Stinson, a national expert in police misconduct who teaches criminology at Bowling Green State University.

Police officers are held to a different legal standard than civilians when they kill people, which means it’s easier for them to argue that using deadly force was justified. That alone can present a challenge to investigators who are compiling evidence to build a case against a particular officer.

“Either the facts are so bizarre that it is obvious to investigators that the shooting was likely unjustified, and/or other officers at the scene immediately report to investigators that they witnessed the incident and they did not perceive an imminent threat that would justify the use of deadly force,” Stinson said.

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A police officer needs to show that they reasonably feared for their life or someone else’s when they opened fire. It’s a legal standard that takes the immediate threat into account as well as the generally dangerous nature of police work. That can leave investigators in a position where they have to pore over the tiniest details of a shooting, like where a suspect’s hands were at each second leading up to their death or how they were standing.

Investigators may also have to interview witnesses and other officers, which pose even more delays because of the so-called “code of silence,” a widespread culture in police departments where officers withhold information or even lie to cover up their colleagues’ misconduct.

Although Cpl. Owen was not wearing a body camera when he shot Green, the known details of the case are particularly shocking.

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