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Australia’s Wildfires Just Put a Smoke Halo All the Way Around the Planet

The world has a smoke halo. Smoke from Australia’s massive bushfires, which have been burning since September, has now officially circled the globe. It’s made its way across the Pacific Ocean, passed over South America, and has now returned to Australia. Over 130 wildfires have burned through nearly 3,000 homes, killed at least 25 people,…

Australia’s Wildfires Just Put a Smoke Halo All the Way Around the Planet

The world has a smoke halo.

Smoke from Australia’s massive bushfires, which have been burning since September, has now officially circled the globe. It’s made its way across the Pacific Ocean, passed over South America, and has now returned to Australia.

Over 130 wildfires have burned through nearly 3,000 homes, killed at least 25 people, and show little signs of abating. Two of the fires merged last week into a “megablaze” on the border of New South Wales and Victoria, Australia’s two most populous states.

“It’s just one, continuous, long line of smoke, and that to me is very unusual,” said Colin Seftor, an atmospheric scientist with NASA. “I haven’t seen that before.” Generally smoke disperses, but the plume from these fires is dense and unbroken.

The smoke has had measurable effects on the air quality in Australia and New Zealand and has already darkened skies in Argentina and Chile. People in South America might be able to smell the smoke, but it’s unlikely to make the air unbreathable. As the smoke drifts around the world through the upper atmosphere, onlookers might notice a red tinge in sunsets as well.

The fires are big enough to create their own cloud formations — pyrocumulonimbus clouds that loft the tiny smoke particles high up into the stratosphere, where they can surf the jetstream around the globe. Those clouds can also create rainless thunderstorms that can ignite even more wildfires.

“By our measures, this is the most extreme pyrocumulonimbus storm outbreak in Australia,” said Michael Fromm, a meteorologist with the Naval Research Laboratory.

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