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Iran’s Khamenei says missile strike a ‘slap in the face’ for US

Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has called his country’s missile strike on US targets in Iraq a “slap in the face” for the US and said Washington’s troops must leave the region. Khamenei’s televised remarks on Wednesday came hours after the missiles were fired at the Ain al-Assad base in Anbar province and a…

Iran’s Khamenei says missile strike a ‘slap in the face’ for US

Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has called his country’s missile strike on US targets in Iraq a “slap in the face” for the US and said Washington’s troops must leave the region.
Khamenei’s televised remarks on Wednesday came hours after the missiles were fired at the Ain al-Assad base in Anbar province and a facility in Erbil amid escalating tensions between Washington and Tehran following the US assassination of Iranian military commander Qassem Soleimani in Iraq last week.
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The Iraqi military said in an online statement that 22 missiles were launched on the two sites between 1:45am and 2:15am on Wednesday (22:45 GMT and 23:15 GMT on Tuesday). Two of the 17 missiles targeting Ain al-Assad base did not go off, the military said, while the five missiles on Erbil all targeted coalition headquarters.
The supreme leader had pledged severe retaliation against the US air strike that killed Soleimani as well as Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the deputy commander of Iraq’s Popular Mobilisation Forces (PMF, or Hashd al-Shaabi), an Iran-backed umbrella organisation, among others.
“Last night we slapped them in the face,” Khamenei said in his speech in the capital, Tehran, adding that military retaliation was not enough.
“What is important is that the corrupt presence of the US in this region should come to an end.”
Khamenei was addressing a large crowd, many of whom were holding pictures of Soleimani, who headed Iran’s Quds Force, the overseas arm of the elite Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC).
Soleimani was buried in the “martyrs section” of a cemetery in his hometown of Kerman after three days of funeral processions that saw his coffin travel to various cities across the country and huge crowds paying respects to him.
Before Soleimani’s burial, a stampede erupted at the procession in Kerman, killing more than 50 people.
“I’m very sorry for that and I’m very sad for that,” Khamenei said, referring to the stampede.
“I would like to express my condolences to their families … I wish their spirits, their souls, join the soul of Soleimani,” he said.
‘Iran is equipped’
Following the missile strike, Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif said Iran had taken and concluded “proportionate measures in self-defence” under Article 51 of the UN Charter.
“We do not seek escalation or war, but will defend ourselves against any aggression,” he said in a Twitter post.
In Washington, US President Donald Trump said in a tweet late on Tuesday that an assessment of casualties and damage from the strikes was under way.
“All is well!” Trump said in the Twitter post, adding that he would make a statement on Wednesday morning.
US officials have said Soleimani was killed because of intelligence indicating forces under his command planned attacks on US targets in the region. But they have not provided this intelligence.
Though it remains to be seen whether the attacks are the end of the latest escalation between the two nations, Iranian television reported a senior official in the Iranian supreme leader’s office as saying that the missile attacks were the “weakest” of several retaliation scenarios.
Accusing the US of bringing “war and hostility” upon the region, Khamenei in his speech reiterated Iran’s readiness to face threats.
“Today, we are armed. The nation of Iran is equipped against the bullies of the world,” he said after praising Soleimani as a man of “bravery” and “effectiveness”.
He paid tribute to the slain general’s work in the region, referencing proxies in Iraq, Syria, and Lebanon.
“The role of our dear martyr was very bold and very important,” Khamenei said of Soleimani, adding that he managed to halt US plans that were “prepared for the West Asia region.”
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Iran’s Zarif in Iraq in his first visit since Soleimani’s killing |NationalTribune.com

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif is visiting Iraq, for the first time since the killing of Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps commander Qassem Soleimani in January. Zarif and his Iraqi counterpart Fuad Hussein stressed the necessity for a stable Iraq for the “good of the region” as the two top diplomats discussed their ties and regional developments in…

Iran’s Zarif in Iraq in his first visit since Soleimani’s killing |NationalTribune.com

Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif is visiting Iraq, for the first time since the killing of Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps commander Qassem Soleimani in January.
Zarif and his Iraqi counterpart Fuad Hussein stressed the necessity for a stable Iraq for the “good of the region” as the two top diplomats discussed their ties and regional developments in Baghdad on Sunday.
Zarif is also expected to meet Iraq’s president, the speaker of parliament and the prime minister during the visit as regional security, bilateral relations and business investments feature on the agenda.
Zarif’s visit to Iraq comes amid tensions between the United States and Iran, which escalated following Soleimani’s killing in an air attack in the Iraqi capital.
In a joint news conference with Hussein, Zarif said a “stable and powerful” Iraq was in the interest of both the countries.

“That is why we look forward to continued constructive bilateral negotiations. The stability, security and peace in Iraq is the stability of the entire region,” he said.
“Again, we reiterate that we are keen on maintaining the sovereignty and territorial integrity of Iraq.”
Fuad Hussein said his country looked forward to continuing its “balanced relations” with all the countries in the region. 
“[The relations are] based on first our national interest, then on mutual interest with our neighbours without any interfering in our domestic affairs.”
Zarif visits Soleimani memorial
During his visit, Zarif visited a memorial to Soleimani at the site where he and Abu Mahdi al-Muhandis, the deputy commander of the Iran-backed Popular Mobilisation Forces (PMF), were killed near Baghdad’s international airport.
Tehran had retaliated by firing a volley of ballistic missiles at US troops stationed in Iraq. 

While the attack on the western Iraqi base of Ain al-Assad killed no US soldiers, dozens were reported to have suffered brain trauma.
Zarif said the assassination of Soleimani was “a criminal act”.
“It is a loss to our country and to the entire region, and it undermines the international efforts for combating ISIL (ISIL) and terrorism in the region,” he said.
This was Zarif’s first visit to Iraq since the killing of Soleimani and formation of the new Iraqi government.
Al Jazeera’s Simona Foltyn, reporting from Baghdad, said the recent months have been turbulent for relations between Iran and Iraq.
“New Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi has been stressing the importance of Iraq’s sovereignty,” she said.
“He also recently moved against armed groups present in Iraq, such as Kataib Hezbollah, which is considered close to Iran,” she said, referring to the Iraqi armed group backed by Tehran.
“This visit is aimed at recalibrating mutual relations and making sure Iran’s security, economic and political interests are represented in Iraq.”
Zarif’s visit comes a day before al-Kadhimi travels to Saudi Arabia and Iran next week in apparent attempt to balance his country’s ties with regional rivals in his first foreign trip as Iraq’s prime minister.
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Fire at Iran’s Natanz nuclear facility caused significant damage |NationalTribune.com

A fire that broke out at Iran’s Natanz nuclear facility last week caused significant damage that could slow the development of advanced centrifuges, an Iranian nuclear official said on Sunday. No one was hurt in the mysterious blaze last Thursday at the site, said Behrouz Kamalvandi, spokesman for Iran’s Atomic Energy Organisation.  Iran’s top security body…

Fire at Iran’s Natanz nuclear facility caused significant damage |NationalTribune.com

A fire that broke out at Iran’s Natanz nuclear facility last week caused significant damage that could slow the development of advanced centrifuges, an Iranian nuclear official said on Sunday.
No one was hurt in the mysterious blaze last Thursday at the site, said Behrouz Kamalvandi, spokesman for Iran’s Atomic Energy Organisation. 
Iran’s top security body said on Friday the cause of the fire at the facility had been determined and would be announced later, however, specific details have yet to be released.
Some Iranian officials reportedly said it may have been caused by cyber-sabotage and one warned Tehran would retaliate against any country carrying out such attacks.
“The incident could slow down the development and production of advanced centrifuges in the medium term,” Kamalvandi was quoted as saying by Iran’s state news agency IRNA.
“Iran will replace the damaged building with a bigger one that has more advanced equipment. The incident has caused significant damage, but there were no casualties.”

An article by IRNA last week addressed what it called the possibility of sabotage by enemies such as Israel and the United States, although it stopped short of accusing either directly.
In 2010, the Stuxnet computer virus, widely believed to have been developed by the US and Israel, was discovered after it was used to attack Natanz.
Israel’s defence minister said on Sunday it was not “necessarily” behind every mysterious incident in Iran.
The Natanz uranium-enrichment site, much of which is underground, is one of several Iranian facilities monitored by inspectors of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), the United Nations nuclear watchdog. 

The IAEA said on Friday the location of the fire did not contain nuclear materials and none of its inspectors was present at the time.
Intensified sanctions
Natanz is the centrepiece of Iran’s enrichment programme, which Tehran says is only for peaceful purposes. Western intelligence agencies and the IAEA believe it had a coordinated, clandestine nuclear arms programme that it halted in 2003.
Tehran denies ever seeking nuclear weapons.
Iran agreed to curb its nuclear programme in exchange for the removal of most international sanctions in a deal reached between Tehran and six world powers in 2015.
But Tehran has gradually reduced its commitments to the accord since US President Donald Trump’s administration withdrew from the agreement in 2018 and reimposed and intensified sanctions that have battered Iran’s economy.
The deal only allows Iran to enrich uranium at Natanz facility with more than 5,000 of first-generation IR-1 centrifuges.

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Iran’s Zarif says ending arms ban ‘inseparable’ from nuclear deal |NationalTribune.com

Iran has said the preservation of its nuclear accord with world powers depends on the scheduled end in October of a UN arms embargo as the United States seeks to extend it.”The timetable for the removal of arms restrictions embodied in Resolution 2231 is an inseparable part of the hard-won compromise,” Iranian Foreign Affairs Minister…

Iran’s Zarif says ending arms ban ‘inseparable’ from nuclear deal |NationalTribune.com

Iran has said the preservation of its nuclear accord with world powers depends on the scheduled end in October of a UN arms embargo as the United States seeks to extend it.”The timetable for the removal of arms restrictions embodied in Resolution 2231 is an inseparable part of the hard-won compromise,” Iranian Foreign Affairs Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif told a United Nations Security Council (UNSC) session, referring to the resolution that blessed the 2015 deal signed to curb the Islamic Republic’s nuclear activities in exchange for sanctions relief.
“Any attempt to change or amend the agreed timetable is thus tantamount to undermining Resolution 2231 in its entirety,” he said.His comments were made after US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo urged the UN body to extend the embargo on Iran.

Washington has circulated a draft resolution to the 15-member council that would indefinitely extend the embargo but Russia and China have already signalled their opposition to such a move.
“If Iran isn’t a threat to peace and security I do not know what it is,” Pompeo said, warning that the embargo’s expiration would risk the stability of the Middle East.”Iran will hold a sword of Damocles over the economic stability of the Middle East, endangering nations like Russia and China that rely on stable energy prices,” he added, referencing two opponents of prolonging the embargo.
Pompeo described Iran as “the world’s most heinous terrorist regime,” and urged the UNSC to reject “extortion diplomacy.”
If the US is unsuccessful in extending the arms embargo, it has threatened to trigger a return of all UN sanctions on Iran under the nuclear deal, from which Washington unilaterally withdrew in 2018.
Zarif countered calling President Donald Trump’s administration “an outlaw bully” that is waging “economic terrorism” on his country to satisfy domestic constituencies and “personal aggrandizement.”
He called for the US to compensate the Iranian people for the damage and vehemently opposed any extension of the arms embargo, warning that Iran’s options “will be firm” if it is maintained and the US will bear full responsibility.
Pompeo’s threat to trigger a new set of sanctions was met with criticism during the meeting by other members who signalled their opposition to the move, while also stressing the importance of respecting the deal.
While Russian diplomat Vassily Nebenzia denounced the US’s attempt to extend the embargo as a “utopia”, China’s UN ambassador, Zhang Jun, stressed that the five-year arms embargo should end as scheduled under the 2015 resolution.”Having quit the JCPOA, the US is no longer a participant and has no right to trigger snapback at the Security Council,” Zhang said, using the official name of the deal, the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action.European allies of the US have voiced support for extending the embargo but also oppose new sanctions, saying the bigger issue is Iran’s nuclear programme.

“Unilateral attempts to trigger UN sanctions snapback are incompatible with our current efforts to preserve the JCPOA,” said the British envoy, Jonathan Allen, referring to the nuclear agreement.
Olof Skoog, the European Union representative to the UN, noted that the US has not participated in any meetings on the nuclear deal since announcing its withdrawal in May 2018.
The UNSC was meeting to discuss a report by Secretary-General Antonio Guterres who said the cruise missiles used in several attacks on oil facilities and an international airport in Saudi Arabia last year were of “Iranian origin”.
Guterres said “these items may have been transferred in a manner inconsistent” with a 2015 Security Council resolution that enshrines Tehran’s deal with world powers to prevent it from developing nuclear weapons.
Iran rejected the report saying it had been drawn up under US and Saudi influence.
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