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‘Justice served’: Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh hail ICJ ruling

Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh – Nearly a dozen men are glued to a television screen inside a ramshackle shop at southern Bangladesh’s Kutupalong refugee camp, home to nearly 40,000 Rohingya refugees. The men were watching the proceedings at the International Court of Justice at The Hague, which on Thursday ordered Myanmar to take urgent measures to…

‘Justice served’: Rohingya refugees in Bangladesh hail ICJ ruling

Cox’s Bazar, Bangladesh – Nearly a dozen men are glued to a television screen inside a ramshackle shop at southern Bangladesh’s Kutupalong refugee camp, home to nearly 40,000 Rohingya refugees.
The men were watching the proceedings at the International Court of Justice at The Hague, which on Thursday ordered Myanmar to take urgent measures to protect its Rohingya population from genocide.
More:

ICJ orders Myanmar to protect Rohingya

Myanmar finds war crimes but no genocide in Rohingya crackdown

Myanmar: Defending genocide at the ICJ

The United Nations’ top court rejected Myanmar civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi’s defence last month when she refuted genocide charges but admitted the country’s military may have used excessive force against the mainly Muslim minority.
The ICJ case was filed by the Muslim-majority African nation of The Gambia, which had asked the court to impose emergency measures following Myanmar army’s 2017 crackdown that forced around 740,000 Rohingya to flee to neighbouring Bangladesh.

Rohingya refugees watching a live telecast of the ICJ trial at the Kutupalong camp [Faisal Mahmud/Al Jazeera]

The ICJ ruling was cheered by refugees as their first major legal victory since they were forced from their homes.
“The ruling has been given. They said a genocide was conducted against us,” said an elderly man at the shop in Kutupalong, one of nearly three dozen Rohingya camps in Cox’s Bazar with over a million refugees, according to the latest figures released by the UN.
‘Justice served to us’
Mohammad Rasel, 26, remembers he was heaping haystacks in front of his home in Myanmar’s Maungdaw district when a mob, including local policemen, entered their village in August 2017.
“They fired gunshots and a bullet hit my father and he immediately fell down,” he told Al Jazeera. “All around us were flames and blood-chilling cries of people.”
Rasel’s home was burned. He fled with his brother and mother, leaving his dying father on the yard of their home.
“They killed my father in front of my eyes and I didn’t get any justice for his death,” he said. “This ruling feels like justice has been served to us.”
Abdur Rahim, a 45-year-old Rohingya ‘majhi’ (community leader), also believed “some sort of justice” has been done with the ICJ ruling.
“We are not going to get back the near and dear ones we have lost in that mindless killing spree. No one is going to compensate us for that,” he told Al Jazeera.
“But at least the world has admitted that a heinous crime was conducted against us.”
Rahim hoped the court order will force Myanmar to “stop the atrocities upon our brothers and sisters” still living in Myanmar.

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