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Libya’s Haftar leaves Moscow without signing ceasefire agreement

Libya’s renegade military commander Khalifa Haftar has left Moscow without signing an agreement that would have formalised a tentative ceasefire in the war-wracked country, according to Russia’s foreign ministry. After hours of negotiations brokered by Russia and Turkey, Haftar on Monday evening asked until Tuesday morning to look over the agreement already signed by Fayez…

Libya’s Haftar leaves Moscow without signing ceasefire agreement

Libya’s renegade military commander Khalifa Haftar has left Moscow without signing an agreement that would have formalised a tentative ceasefire in the war-wracked country, according to Russia’s foreign ministry.
After hours of negotiations brokered by Russia and Turkey, Haftar on Monday evening asked until Tuesday morning to look over the agreement already signed by Fayez al-Sarraj, the head of the United Nations-recognised Government of National Accord (GNA).
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But Haftar, whose eastern-based forces launched an offensive to seize the GNA’s base of Tripoli in April, left Moscow without signing the deal drafted at the indirect talks, Russia’s foreign ministry was quoted as saying by TASS news agency on Tuesday.
Libyan sources confirmed Haftar’s departure.
“The draft [agreement] ignores many of the Libyan army’s demands,” Haftar was quoted as saying by the Al Arabiya television network.
The talks in the Russian capital were held a day after a fragile ceasefire brokered by Russia and Turkey came into force in Libya.
The negotiations did not include the warring sides meeting face to face, but Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov said on Monday there was “progress” and that Haftar viewed the ceasefire document “positively”.
On Tuesday, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Ankara would teach Haftar “a lesson” if he resumed his offensive on Tripoli.
“We will not hesitate to teach a lesson to the putchist Haftar if he continues his attacks on the country’s legitimate administration and our brothers in Libya,” Erdogan said during a meeting of his ruling AK Party. 
Erdogan last week announced that Turkey had begun deploying troops to Libya after the Turkish parliament ratified two agreemend signed with GNA head al-Sarraj relating to martime border demarcation and enhanced security cooperation. 
Berlin summit
It is unclear where the developments in Moscow leave a peace summit scheduled to take place in Germany’s capital, Berlin, on Sunday. 
The conference, part of UN Special Envoy Ghassan Salame’s efforts to bring an end to the conflict, has been postponed several times due to continued fighting along Tripoli’s southern outskirts.
On Tuesday, the eastern-based forces under Haftar’s command posted on their official Facebook page that they were “ready and determined” to achieve victory in their months-long campaign to seize the capital from the GNA.
“The GNA has documented several violations by Haftar’s forces overnight and one pro-government fighter was killed by a sniper, according to a government spokesperson,” Al Jazeera’s Mahmoud Abdelwahed, reporting from Tripoli, said.
“Military sources have stated that they documented deployment, regrouping and repositioning in several axis by Haftar’s forces … building trust between the rival factions is going to be a tough task.” 
Tarik Yousef, director of the Brookings Institution’s Doha Center, said the Berlin talks now depended on Haftar’s next move. 
“The talks are in jeopardy and in fact, the next potential reversal on the ground could be one that sets back Russia and Turkish diplomacy and provide a big opportunity and a test in my view for Turkey’s commitment to defending the government in Tripoli,” Yousef told Al Jazeera. 
Yousef said Haftar’s decision to opt out of the ceasefire agreement was puzzling and could be explained in part by the diverging interests of his many backers. Haftar enjoys the backing of several states besides Russia. These include, among others, Egypt, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. 
“The speculation in Libya and abroad is that given that Haftar is not accountable to anyone in Libya, his external sponsors, other than Russia, have put pressure on him to delay, postpone or try to make gains within the ceasefire agreement.” 
The oil-rich country has been marred by instability since a 2011 NATO-backed uprising that toppled longtime leader Muammar Gaddafi.
It has since been split between two rival administrations based in the country’s east and west amid a conflict drawing increasing involvement from foreign powers.
According to the latest UN tally, more than 280 civilians and roughly 2,000 fighters have been killed since Haftar launched his offensive in April. An estimated 146,000 Libyans have been displaced.
Efforts to demobilise and reintegrate fighters that helped topple Gaddafi into the formal security apparatus have largely failed.
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Haftar rejects GNA’s call for Libya ceasefire |NationalTribune.com

Renegade military commander Khalifa Haftar’s forces have dismissed a ceasefire announcement by Libya’s internationally recognised government as a “marketing” stunt. Ahmed Mismari, spokesman for Haftar’s self-styled Libyan National Army (LNA), said on Sunday rival forces from the war-torn country’s west were mobilising around front lines in the centre of the country. In a media briefing, he…

Haftar rejects GNA’s call for Libya ceasefire |NationalTribune.com

Renegade military commander Khalifa Haftar’s forces have dismissed a ceasefire announcement by Libya’s internationally recognised government as a “marketing” stunt.
Ahmed Mismari, spokesman for Haftar’s self-styled Libyan National Army (LNA), said on Sunday rival forces from the war-torn country’s west were mobilising around front lines in the centre of the country.
In a media briefing, he said the eastern-based forces were ready to respond to any attempted attack on its positions around the coastal city of Sirte and Jufra, further inland.
Mismari’s comments were the first by the LNA after the announcement on Friday of a ceasefire and a call for the resumption of oil production by the Tripoli-based Government of National Accord (GNA), headed by Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj.
“The initiative that al-Sarraj signed is for media marketing,” Mismari said. “There is a military build-up and the transfer of equipment to target our forces in Sirte,” he added.
“If al-Sarraj wanted a ceasefire, he would have drawn his forces back, not advanced towards our units in Sirte.”
Mismari made no reference to a parallel ceasefire call also issued on Friday by the head of Libya’s eastern-based parliament, Aguila Saleh. Saleh has gained influence compared with Haftar since Turkish military support for the GNA forced the LNA to retreat from a 14-month offensive on Tripoli in June.
Al Jazeera’s Malik Traina, reporting from Misrata, said: “Previously in any negotiations or any peace talks in Libya, Haftar was a very significant member and very involved in these kinds of talks – and he’s feeling sidelined now.”
Traina noted this was not the first time Haftar had rejected a ceasefire agreement. In January, Turkey and Russia also tried to support a truce that was signed by the GNA in Moscow, but not by Haftar.
“If Haftar’s foreign backers stop supporting him, does this mean that the GNA will be able to make advances? Does this mean that Saleh and al-Sarraj will be able to come to a peaceful agreement and bring about a lasting peace in Libya? That remains to be seen,” Traina said.

 Meanwhile on Saturday, Libya’s High Council of State, an advisory body to the GNA, vehemently rejected any dialogue with Haftar.
In a statement, it underlined the need to seriously work to end the “state of insurgency” in the country through an immediate ceasefire and the need to enable the government to take control over all of Libyan soil.
“Any dialogue or agreement should be under the Libyan political agreement, which regulated the mechanism of dialogue to be only between elected bodies,” it added.
With Haftar loyalists blocking oil facilities in the country in recent months, the council also called for resuming the production and export of oil – Libya’s main source of income – and holding those responsible for the closure of the facilities accountable.
Libya splintered into rival political and armed groupings after the uprising that toppled and killed longtime ruler Muammar Gaddafi in 2011.
The oil-rich country remains deeply divided between factions based in the east and west that back rival governments and parliaments.
The conflict has become an arena for regional rivalries, with Haftar being supported by Egypt, Russia and the United Arab Emirates and the GNA having the backing of Turkey and Qatar.
There has been little fighting since June. In the past, both sides have accused each other of quickly violating truces and using them to rearm.
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Erdogan

Erdogan: Haftar, his backers biggest obstacle to peace in Libya |NationalTribune.com

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has pledged increased support for Libya’s internationally-recognised Government of National Accord (GNA) fighting Khalifa Haftar’s forces, calling the renegade military commander and his allies the biggest obstacle to peace in the war-torn country. Speaking at a joint news conference with GNA Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj in Ankara, Erdogan said on Thursday…

Erdogan: Haftar, his backers biggest obstacle to peace in Libya |NationalTribune.com

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has pledged increased support for Libya’s internationally-recognised Government of National Accord (GNA) fighting Khalifa Haftar’s forces, calling the renegade military commander and his allies the biggest obstacle to peace in the war-torn country.
Speaking at a joint news conference with GNA Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj in Ankara, Erdogan said on Thursday history would judge those who caused “bloodshed and tears” in Libya by supporting Haftar, whom he described as a “putschist”.
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Erdogan also said a solution to the crisis in Libya can only be achieved politically and through efforts under the auspices of the United Nations.
Turkey and the GNA signed in November a military cooperation pact alongside a maritime demarcation deal, which gives Ankara oil exploration rights in the Mediterranean Sea that Greece and other countries reject.

The Turkish support has been crucial in the GNA’s efforts to push back Haftar’s self-styled Libyan National Army (LNA), which launched an offensive in April last year to seize Tripoli. On Thursday, after a string of recent military gains, the GNA said it had captured all areas surrounding the Tripoli city administrative area.
Ankara has sent equipment and military personnel to Tripoli following the signing of the agreements and has urged Haftar’s backers to end their support of his eastern-based forces. The LNA has been backed by the United Arab Emirates, Russia and Egypt.
‘Historic stance’
For his part, al-Sarraj thanked Turkey for “its historic and brave stance” in Libya and said the GNA would continue its struggle until Haftar was eliminated.
The latest advance of the GNA around Tripoli is expected to hasten steps towards a potential truce.

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On Monday, the UN said both sides had agreed to resume ceasefire talks, warning that weapons and fighters being flown into Libya in defiance of an embargo threatened a big new escalation.
Several peacemaking efforts in Libya have collapsed or been stalled since clashes began in 2014.
In a flurry of diplomacy, Serraj’s deputy was in Moscow and Haftar was in Egypt this week.
An increased presence in Libya would give Turkey strategic positioning near Egypt, with which ties are strained.
Tensions in Mediterranean 
In the news conference, Erdogan also said Turkey and Libya would advance exploration and drilling for oil in the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

Libya’s GNA says it regained full control of the capital, Tripoli

If this Ankara goes ahead with the move, Libya will also serve as another foothold for Turkey in the Mediterranean, where Turkey has been at odds with several neighbouring states.
Greece and Cyprus called last year’s maritime deal with Serraj illegal, an accusation Ankara denied.
Greece says Ankara’s maritime deal infringes on Crete’s continental shelf. Turkey – which has also been criticised by Israel and the European Union – says the deal abides by international law and rejects the notion islands can have such shelves.
Turkey previously said it could begin exploration and drilling in the eastern Mediterranean under the GNA deal within three or four months.
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Haftar dismisses UN Libya unity deal as ‘thing of the past’

Libya’s eastern-based renegade military commander Khalifa Haftar has declared a landmark 2015 United Nations-brokered agreement to unite the country “a thing of the past”, and pledged his authorities would move towards creating a new government. “The political agreement destroyed the country. We will work to create the conditions for building permanent civic institutions, he said…

Haftar dismisses UN Libya unity deal as ‘thing of the past’

Libya’s eastern-based renegade military commander Khalifa Haftar has declared a landmark 2015 United Nations-brokered agreement to unite the country “a thing of the past”, and pledged his authorities would move towards creating a new government.
“The political agreement destroyed the country. We will work to create the conditions for building permanent civic institutions, he said in a televised speech on Monday. 
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Haftar did not make clear whether an elected parliament in the country’s east – under whose jurisdiction his forces nominally fall – backed his move, or what its future role would be.    
In April 2019, Haftar launched a military campaign to wrest control of the capital, Tripoli, but the offensive has largely been stalled by forces loyal to the Government of National Accord (GNA). 
A counteroffensive by GNA-aligned troops in late March resulted in Haftar’s self-styled Libyan National Army (LNA) being expelled from several key western cities.
Haftar receives support from the United Arab Emirates, Egypt and Russia. The GNA is backed by Turkey.
Reporting from Tripoli, Al Jazeera’s Mahmoud Abdelwahed said that Haftar’s forces have intensified their attacks on the outskirts of the capital since the defeats in western Libya. He said they continued to shell residential areas in the southern Tripoli on Monday.
“Since early morning, we have been hearing sounds of heavy explosions. Military sources with the GNA say Haftar’s forces have been shelling several areas in southern Tripoli indiscriminately.
“In many cases, random rockets landed in residential areas. Today, a woman was killed along with one of her sons, while three of her other children were injured in a random rocket attack launched by Haftar’s forces.”
Haftar had in a speech last week called on Libyans in territory under his control to hold demonstrations and give him a mandate to rule.
Despite a curfew imposed to slow the spread of the coronavirus, crowds thronged the streets of Benghazi and chanted slogans against the rival Tripoli administration. 
The UN set up the Tripoli-based government in 2015 following the emergence of the two rival centres of power.
The agreement, frequently condemned by Haftar and his supporters, bestows international legitimacy on the GNA under the leadership of Prime Minister Fayez al-Sarraj.
It also acknowledges the House of Representatives based in Tobruk as the country’s official legislature and grants consultative powers to the previous parliament based in Tripoli.
“Haftar has once more exposed his authoritarian intentions to the world,” Mohammed Ali Abdallah, an adviser to the GNA, said in a statement.
“He no longer seeks to conceal his contempt for a political solution and democracy in Libya. His statement tonight is the final, desperate act of a defeated man.”
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