Connect with us

jails

Pakistan jails Mumbai attacks suspect Hafiz Saeed: Lawyer

Islamabad, Pakistan – A Pakistani anti-terrorism court has sentenced Hafiz Muhammad Saeed, the founder of the Lashkar-e-Taiba armed group, to five and a half years’ prison in a case related to terrorism financing, his lawyer says. Saeed was convicted and sentenced on two counts by a court in the eastern city of Lahore on Wednesday,…

Pakistan jails Mumbai attacks suspect Hafiz Saeed: Lawyer

Islamabad, Pakistan – A Pakistani anti-terrorism court has sentenced Hafiz Muhammad Saeed, the founder of the Lashkar-e-Taiba armed group, to five and a half years’ prison in a case related to terrorism financing, his lawyer says.
Saeed was convicted and sentenced on two counts by a court in the eastern city of Lahore on Wednesday, Imran Gill, the lawyer, told Al Jazeera.
He was sentenced to six months’ imprisonment for being a member of a “proscribed organisation” under Pakistani law, and another five years for a charge related to “illegal property”, Gill said.
More:

‘Are we stronger now?’ India marks 10 years since Mumbai attacks

Pakistani police arrest Lashkar-e-Taiba founder Hafiz Saeed

Al Jazeera exclusive with Hafiz Saeed

Abdur Rauf Wattoo, the government’s prosecutor in the case, confirmed the verdict, adding that Saeed’s associate Zafar Iqbal had also been convicted and sentenced to the same term.
The arrest and charging of Saeed, the alleged mastermind of the 2008 Mumbai attacks that killed more than 160 people, has been a long-standing demand of the United States and Pakistan’s neighbour India.

The 70-year-old says he is not linked to any armed group, although he heads Jamaat-ud-Dawa (JuD), the charitable arm of the LeT group. Both the JuD and LeT are “banned organisations” under Pakistani anti-terrorism law.
Saeed’s conviction comes days ahead of a key meeting of the Financial Action Task Force (FATF), an intergovernmental watchdog that monitors terrorism and criminal financing laws, in Paris.
FATF will be issuing a decision on whether Pakistan has taken sufficient steps to avoid being “blacklisted”, a designation that would come as a blow to the South Asian nation’s struggling economy.
A FATF blacklisting would put in place barriers that would serve to isolate Pakistan’s economy from the international banking system, introducing stricter checks and safeguards on transactions involving the country.
Saeed was indicted in December on six charges under anti-terrorism laws, with verdicts still due in four cases.
“Section 11-N of the Anti-Terrorism Act deals with possessing property, facilitating and fundraising … if a proscribed person or organisation holds a property, then that is considered to be for the purpose of terrorism,” said Wattoo, the prosecutor.
“So on that basis the court has found sufficient evidence and convicted Zafar Iqbal and Hafiz Saeed on two counts each.”
First conviction since 2008 attacks
LeT is accused of operating with impunity from Pakistani soil to attack Indian security and government targets in Indian-administered Kashmir. Pakistan and India both claim the mountainous territory of Kashmir in full, but administer separate portions of it.
They have fought two of their three wars over the territory, with India accusing Pakistan of also supporting armed groups like LeT and Jaish-e-Muhammad that attack Indian targets in Indian-administered Kashmir.
Pakistan denies the charges, saying it has been acting against all armed groups operating on its soil.
Wednesday’s development is the first time Saeed has been convicted on any charges since the 2008 Mumbai attacks.
In December 2014, a Pakistani court granted bail to Zaki-ur-Rehman Lakhvi, another senior LeT commander, in a case related to the Mumbai attacks, saying there was not enough evidence to continue to hold him.
Saeed says he is no longer associated with LeT, and claims JuD only conducts humanitarian aid work. JuD and its Falah-e-Insaniat Foundation (FIF) have operated a network of dozens of schools and hundreds of ambulances, providing humanitarian relief in all four Pakistani provinces.The UN has long designated the JuD and FIF as fronts for the LeT.
Last year, under pressure after the FATF review, Pakistan formally banned Saeed’s JuD and other associated organisations, after years of allowing them to operate freely across the country.
Saeed remains in custody, and will now be shifted to prison, as verdicts in the four remaining terrorism financing cases are expected later this week.
Asad Hashim is Al Jazeera’s digital correspondent in Pakistan. He tweets @AsadHashim
Continue Reading…

Egypt

Egypt jails TikTok women influencers over ‘indecent’ content |NationalTribune.com

An Egyptian court has sentenced five female social media influencers to two years in jail each on charges of violating public morals. The verdict against Haneen Hossam, Mowada al-Adham and three others came after they had posted footage on video-sharing app TikTok. The ruling, which can be appealed, included a fine of 300,000 Egyptian pounds…

Egypt jails TikTok women influencers over ‘indecent’ content |NationalTribune.com

An Egyptian court has sentenced five female social media influencers to two years in jail each on charges of violating public morals.
The verdict against Haneen Hossam, Mowada al-Adham and three others came after they had posted footage on video-sharing app TikTok.
The ruling, which can be appealed, included a fine of 300,000 Egyptian pounds ($18,750) for each defendant, the source noted.
Haneen Hossam, 20, a Cairo University student, was charged for encouraging young women to meet men through a video app and build friendships with them, receiving a fee according to the number of followers watching these chats.
Mawada al-Adham, a TikTok and Instagram influencer with at least two million followers, was accused of publishing indecent photos and videos on social media.
The three other women were charged with helping Hossam and Al-Adham manage their social media accounts, according to the public prosecution.
Al-Adham’s lawyer Ahmed el-Bahkeri confirmed the sentences and said they would appeal the verdict.
Hossam was arrested in April after posting a three-minute clip telling her 1.3 million followers that girls could make money by working with her.

In May, authorities arrested Adham who had posted satirical videos on TikTok and Instagram.
Lawyer el-Bahkeri said the young women were facing separate charges over the sources of their funds.
‘Dangerous indicator’
Internet penetration has reached more than 40 percent of Egypt’s youthful population of more than 100 million.
“The verdict is shocking, though it was expected. We will see what happens on appeal,” said women’s rights lawyer Intissar al-Saeed.
“It is still a dangerous indicator … Regardless of the divergent views on the content presented by the girls on TikTok, it still is not a reason for imprisonment.”
Several rights activists took to social media to condemn the arrests.
A hashtag trending in Arabic that translates to “with the permission of the Egyptian family” was widely used in an online social media campaign to draw attention to the case and demanded the release of the women influencers.

(1) Today, you’ll find many tweeting #بعد_اذن_الاسرة_المصرية. They started at 1 pm (Cairo time) & will continue through the day to raise attention ahead of 2 expected verdicts this week for 3 Egyptian female TikTok users: Haneen Hosam & Mawada El-Adham (7/27) & Manar Samy (7/29). pic.twitter.com/fxoTvRewmN
— Mai El-Sadany (@maitelsadany) July 26, 2020

Two women today in Egypt got sentenced Two years and 300,000 EGP fine for just dancing and singing on #TikTok @ncwegypt is a complicit in this injustice by their silence. This is injustice , misogyny and a serious violation of digital freedom.#بعد_اذن_الاسرة_المصرية
— يسقط العالم (@Saldroite) July 27, 2020

Did you know Egypt still runs virginity tests? And that it’s chasing down women influencers on #TikTok instead of handling a pandemic? because chastity y’all!#بعد_اذن_الاسرة_المصرية https://t.co/49dqS9XoOn
— Nana (@Nabuels) July 27, 2020

A petition was also launched on Change.org demanding the release of the influencers with more than 1500 signatures.
“We are a group of women calling on state authorities to stop targeting women on TikTok. We call on the National Council for Women to provide legal support for Haneen Hossam, Mawada El-Adham, Menna AbdelAziz, Sherry Hanem, Nora Hesham, Manar Samy, Reenad Emad, Hadeer Hady, and Bassant Mohamed,” the petition said.
Egypt has cracked down in recent years on female singers and dancers for online content deemed too racy or suggestive.
Last month, an Egyptian court sentenced belly dancer Sama al-Masry to three years for inciting “debauchery” on social media after posting a TikTok dance video.

In 2018, a female singer was detained for “incitement to debauchery” after an online video clip which included sensual dance moves went viral.
The previous year, a female pop singer was sentenced to two years in prison on similar charges, also for a video deemed provocative. Her sentence was reduced to a year on appeal.
“The charges of spreading debauchery or violating family values are very loose … and its definition is broad,” said Saeed.
Egypt has, in recent years, enforced strict internet controls through laws allowing authorities to block websites deemed a threat to national security and to monitor personal social media accounts with more than 5,000 followers.
Continue Reading…

Continue Reading

Trending