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Several injured after car crashes into carnival crowd in Germany

Police could not provide further details and urged people not to spread ‘unconfirmed reports’ about the incident [Elmar Schulten/Waldeckische Landeszeitung/Reuters] A man intentionally rammed a car into a crowd at a carnival procession in the German town of Volkmarsen, injuring dozens of people including children, police said. The suspect, a 29-year-old German citizen, was arrested but…

Several injured after car crashes into carnival crowd in Germany

Police could not provide further details and urged people not to spread ‘unconfirmed reports’ about the incident [Elmar Schulten/Waldeckische Landeszeitung/Reuters]
A man intentionally rammed a car into a crowd at a carnival procession in the German town of Volkmarsen, injuring dozens of people including children, police said.
The suspect, a 29-year-old German citizen, was arrested but could not be immediately questioned because he was injured in the incident and being treated by doctors.
He is being investigated on suspicion of attempted homicide.
Police spokesman Henning Hinn confirmed that Monday’s crash was deliberate, adding: “There were several dozen injured, among them some seriously and sadly also children.”
He did not provide further details about the suspect’s possible motive.
Frankfurt police chief Gerhard Bereswill was quoted as saying by local media that 30 people were injured, seven of whom were in serious condition.
The incident took place on the south side of Volkmarsen, outside a supermarket.

Forensic police officers are seen close to the site where a car drove into a carnival procession in Volkmarsen near Kassel, central Germany, on Rose Monday, February 24, 2020 [Uwe Zucchi/dpa/AFP]

Video footage showed a silver Mercedes station wagon with local licence plates and its hazard lights blinking on the pavement while emergency crews walked by.
The carnival is popular in parts of Germany, especially in Rhineland cities such as Cologne and Duesseldorf, where festivities peaked on “Rose Monday” (February 24) with tens of thousands attending street parades featuring comical or satirical floats.
Volkmarsen, a town of about 7,000 people, is in Hesse, a central German state; all carnival parades across the state were cancelled as a precaution.
However, state police said they had no indication of a threat anywhere else in Germany.

SOURCE:
Al Jazeera and news agencies

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Dozens

One dead, dozens injured in Lebanon riots with banks smashed

Beirut, Lebanon – One man died on Tuesday after violent clashes in Lebanon’s northern city of Tripoli that left dozens injured after the Lebanese army used live fire, rubber-coated rounds, and tear gas to clear angry protesters. Thousands of protesters across Lebanon blocked roads, attacked banks, and marched through streets throughout Monday in response to the…

One dead, dozens injured in Lebanon riots with banks smashed

Beirut, Lebanon – One man died on Tuesday after violent clashes in Lebanon’s northern city of Tripoli that left dozens injured after the Lebanese army used live fire, rubber-coated rounds, and tear gas to clear angry protesters.
Thousands of protesters across Lebanon blocked roads, attacked banks, and marched through streets throughout Monday in response to the local currency’s rapid devaluation, which has led millions to lose more than half the value of their salaries and savings.
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A 26-year-old man’s sister, Fatima Fouad, said in a Facebook post that her brother, Fouaz Fouad al-Seman, died as a result of live gunfire by Lebanese soldiers. 
An army source confirmed to Al Jazeera that troops used live fire, but said they shot in the air, not at protesters. The source also confirmed a man died, but said it was unclear how, adding rubber-coated bullets and tear gas were used on demonstrators. 
Lebanon is suffering its worst-ever financial crisis that has led to a dollar shortage, which in turn has seen the Lebanese pound tumble by more than 50 percent in the last six months. 
Unprecedented anti-establishment protests that began last October had mostly disappeared as the country went into lockdown over the COVID-19 pandemic, but dire living conditions brought people back to the streets in at least two-dozen locations since Sunday.

Soldiers attempt to open the northern highway during protests against the collapsing Lebanese pound [Nabil Mounzer/EPA]

Northern Tripoli, Lebanon’s second-largest and poorest city, saw the largest protests on Monday with hundreds of demonstrators taking to the streets. The situation quickly turned into riots as banks were vandalised and set alight.
Lebanon’s army said 54 soldiers were among the wounded during attempts to open roads and quell riots across the country. Forty troops were injured in incidents in Tripoli.
“The army leadership, while reaffirming its respect for the right of citizens to express their opinions, warns of some attempts to exploit demonstrations to carry out actions that affect security and stability,” a statement said, adding the army “will never tolerate any violation of security”.
The Lebanese army said two soldiers were injured when a grenade was thrown at an army patrol, while an army vehicle was torched using Molotov cocktails in the middle of Tripoli’s Al-Nour square, the heart of anti-establishment protests that broke out in October of last year.
Molotov cocktails have been thrown at at least five banks since the weekend, including in the capital Beirut.
Banks have for six months been limiting withdrawals of the local currency and have entirely phased out withdrawals in foreign currencies that were previously standard. 

People inspect a bank set ablaze overnight by protesters [Ibrahim Chalhoub/AFP]

‘We’re coming for you’ 
Video from Monday night showed protesters raining down a hail of rocks on soldiers in Tripoli, while the sound of heavy gunfire can be heard. Protesters also took to the streets in southern Sidon, chanting “Molotov, Molotov, instead of a candle, Molotov,” outside a local branch of the Central Bank.
Lebanon’s protests began as a largely peaceful uprising last year, when hundreds of thousands took to the streets to demand political change and an end to endemic corruption that sapped the state’s resources. But over the last few months, they have become more desperate as people struggle to make ends meet and secure basic needs, including food. 
Human Rights Watch has warned millions could go hungry unless the government puts forward a robust social-safety net. But when the cabinet sought to get approval for a large spending bill at a parliament session earlier this month, quorum was lost and the decision postponed. 
“This is a letter to each corrupt politician,” a protester in Tripoli said to his camera Monday night. “When we the Lebanese people get hungry, we’re going to remove you one by one… We’re coming for you one by one.”
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Dozens injured as plane skids off Istanbul airport runway

A plane flying into Istanbul’s Sabiha Gokcen International Airport has skidded off the runway after landing and crashed, injuring at least 120 people, Turkish authorities said. The plane crashed into a field and broke into three pieces on Wednesday. Passengers were seen evacuating through cracks in the plane. The Boeing 737 operated by Turkish low-cost carrier…

Dozens injured as plane skids off Istanbul airport runway

A plane flying into Istanbul’s Sabiha Gokcen International Airport has skidded off the runway after landing and crashed, injuring at least 120 people, Turkish authorities said.
The plane crashed into a field and broke into three pieces on Wednesday. Passengers were seen evacuating through cracks in the plane.
The Boeing 737 operated by Turkish low-cost carrier Pegasus Airlines had flown into Istanbul’s Sabiha Gokcen airport from the Aegean port city of Izmir, NTV television reported.
The plane was apparently buffeted by strong winds and heavy rain lashing Istanbul, Turkey’s largest city.  
“At the moment, 120 people who were injured have been hospitalised,” said governor Ali Yerlikaya, adding that most of them were “doing well, aside from one or two people.” There were no deaths.
“Some passengers evacuated the plane by themselves but others are stuck inside and our rescuers are working to free them,” Transport Minister Mehmet Cahit Turhan said on CNN-Turk television.

At least 120 people were injured in the crash and taken to hospital [Murad Sezer/Reuters]

The plane was carrying 171 passengers and six crew members, the governor said, while Turkish media reports said there were 12 children on board.
Governor Yerlikaya said the plane “slid some 60 metres” after skidding off the runway, and then “fell about 30-40 metres” down a bank. 
The accident, which he attributed to bad weather, “could have had more serious consequences,” he said.
NTV showed images of the badly damaged plane and flames inside, which were later put out by firefighters.
“Pegasus are known for their low fares but it would be unfair to brand them as unsafe just because they offer very competitive fares,” said aviation specialist Alex Macheras. 
“But there will be serious questions asked now that this airline has suffered what is now its second runway excursion in just four weeks at this point.” 
After darkness fell, television footage showed dozens of rescue workers in high-visibility jackets surrounding the plane with flashlights. 
Some sprayed water jets onto the severed body of the aircraft, while others could be seen climbing up onto the plane to comb through the cabin.
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