Connect with us

Fauci

Fauci warns US on coronavirus as cases surge: Live updates |NationalTribune.com

Top US medical expert, Dr Anthony Fauci, is warning that the country, already “hit badly” by the coronavirus, is facing a dangerous surge in new cases. Arizona, Texas and Nevada all reported a record number of daily cases. EU countries are considering banning entry to Americans as the US has failed in controlling the spread of…

Fauci warns US on coronavirus as cases surge: Live updates |NationalTribune.com

Top US medical expert, Dr Anthony Fauci, is warning that the country, already “hit badly” by the coronavirus, is facing a dangerous surge in new cases. Arizona, Texas and Nevada all reported a record number of daily cases.
EU countries are considering banning entry to Americans as the US has failed in controlling the spread of the coronavirus, according to the New York Times.
Worldwide, nearly 9.2 million people have been confirmed to have the coronavirus. More than 4.6 million have recovered, while more than 474,000 have died, according to Johns Hopkins University.
Here are the latest updates:
Wednesday, June 24
06:21 GMT – Hong Kong dismisses privacy concerns in China travel scheme
Sophia Chan, Hong Kong’s secretary for food and health, defended a planned travel scheme requiring residents of the city to share their coronavirus test results with authorities in Guangdong province in mainland China, dismissing concerns that residents’ sensitive personal data, such as medical records, could be transferred to mainland security authorities. 
Hong Kong will develop a “Health Code” system to enable “the virus test results of participants of the pilot scheme in Hong Kong to be uploaded onto the code” and shared with mainland authorities, she said. Travellers will not be required to install a mobile application, she said. 
“The … computer system will only collect basic personal information and nucleic acid test results from applicants for the purpose of applying for the ‘Hong Kong Health Code’. The development process is premised on the protection of personal privacy and the code exchange procedures must also be explicitly initiated and agreed by the applicant,” she added.
05:30 GMT – Maldives to open borders to all tourists on July 15
Ibrahim Mohamed Solih, president of the Maldives, says the island nation is opening its borders on July 15 to tourist arrivals from all countries.
The Indian Ocean archipelago’s economy is heavily dependent on tourism, and arrivals will not be subject to quarantine measures with only symptomatic travellers required to undergo mandatory COVID-19 testing at the airport, according to the tourism ministry.
Testing will be made available for travellers who require it to return to their countries or continue on their onward journeys, the ministry added.

Guidance for visitors travelling to the Maldives#VisitMaldives #SunnySideofLife pic.twitter.com/cDNvlBggzG
— Ministry of Tourism (@MoTmv) June 23, 2020

05:08 GMT – Indonesia volunteers launch ‘alertness index’
Volunteers in Indonesia introduced an “alertness index” mapping coronavirus cases in every city and regency in the country, with the worst-affected places marked in deep red.
“At the end of the day, the public needs transparent data about their risks. With reliable and open data, they can cautiously decide whether to carry out an activity in the public sphere,” Ronald Bessie, coordinator for the KawalCOVID-9 database, was quoted as saying by the Jakarta Post.

— KawalCOVID19 (@KawalCOVID19) June 23, 2020

04:59 GMT – Virus deaths surpass 100,000 in Latin America
More than 100,000 people had died from COVID-19 in Latin American by the end of Tuesday, with more than half of confirmed deaths logged in Brazil, according to tallies by Reuters and AFP news agencies.
Here is a breakdown of case-loads and death tolls in the worst affected countries:
Brazil – 52,960 deaths and 1,145,906 cases
Mexico – 23,377 deaths and 191,410 cases
Peru – 8,404 deaths and 260,810 cases
Chile – 4,505 deaths and 250,767 cases

04:23 GMT – In conflict-hit countries, coronavirus testing may not reach women
Big gaps between the number of male and female coronavirus cases in parts of Africa, Asia and the Middle East suggest that women may be struggling to access testing or care, an aid agency told the Thomson Reuters Foundation.
In Pakistan, Afghanistan and Yemen, more than 70 percent of reported cases were male, compared with a global average of 51 percent, the same in the Central African Republic, Chad and Somalia, said the International Rescue Committee (IRC).
Studies in China, Europe and the US have shown that men are more likely than women to be hospitalised and die of coronavirus, but they have not shown the same gender gap in cases as elsewhere. In most of Europe, the numbers of cases are roughly equal between men and women.

04:13 GMT – Beijing’s outbreak appears to be firmly waning
Health authorities in China reported 12 new coronavirus cases on Wednesday, with seven in the country’s capital, Beijing, indicating that a spike in the city appears to be on the wane.
Beijing’s outbreak saw a total of 249 people infected since June 11, most cases linked to the city’s biggest wholesale market, and led to new lockdowns and the cancellation of classes.
Since then, three million test samples have been taken from 2.43 million people in the city, a senior municipal health official said on Tuesday. The city can now conduct more than 300,000 nucleic acid tests per day, compared with 40,000 in March, said Zhang Hua, deputy director of the Beijing Health Commission.

A worker in protective suit sprays disinfectant as medical workers conduct nucleic acid tests at a testing site in Beijing [Carlos Garcia Rawlins/ Reuters]

03:00 GMT – Washington state makes face masks mandatory
Jay Inslee, the governor of the US state of Washington, ordered residents to wear face masks in public after the region saw its positive tests rise by 35 percent last week.
“This is about saving lives. It’s about reopening our businesses. And it’s about showing respect and care for one another,” Inslee said.
The states of Arizona, California, Mississippi and Nevada have reported record numbers of new cases of COVID-19 while Texas set a record on Monday. 
02:42 GMT – Mexico logs another record rise in cases
Mexico posted another record one-day increase in coronavirus cases: 6,288 confirmed infections on Tuesday and 793 more deaths, according to the Health Department. That brought Mexico’s total case-load to 191,410 and death toll to 23,377.
Officials acknowledge both are undercounts due to extremely low testing rates. Mexico has performed only about half a million tests, roughly one for every 250 inhabitants.
Mexico has also had an extremely high rate of infections among healthcare professionals. About 39,000 – 20 percent – of the country’s confirmed cases are healthcare workers. There have been 584 deaths among doctors, nurses, technicians and hospital workers.

A man has his temperature checked at Iztapalapa market in Mexico City on June 22, 2020 [Pedro Pardo/ AFP]

02:00 GMT – MSF calls on GAVI to get drugs companies to sell vaccine at cost
Doctors Without Borders (MSF) and 40 civil society groups are calling on GAVI to review its pricing for future coronavirus vaccines, ahead of a Gavi board meeting due to start in Geneva later on Wednesday.
At issue is the COVAX Facility, a new mechanism Gavi developed to pay pharmaceutical companies up front for potential COVID-19 vaccines.
Among MSF’s concerns was the lack of transparency on how pricing is set by drug firms as well as the two-tier system of access to future COVID-19 vaccines bought through the COVAX Facility. Countries financed through donor assistance will only receive enough vaccines for the most vulnerable populations while wealthier nations will receive enough for a set percentage of their entire population, MSF said.

The #COVID19 pandemic has exposed the flaws in the current drug development system. As @Gavi prepares for a Board meeting this week, we have some urgent recommendations to ensure that COVID-19 vaccines 💉 are accessible, affordable and available to EVERYONE who needs them. 👇 pic.twitter.com/2bLmPFF175
— MSF International (@MSF) June 23, 2020

01:30 GMT – Australia records first coronavirus death in more than a month
Australia has recorded its first death from coronavirus in more than a month, as new cases continue to spike in the southern state of Victoria.
The man who died was in his 80s, health authorities said.
Victoria recorded 20 new cases overnight, taking the state’s total to 1,900.
23:45 GMT – Trump claims border wall ‘stopped’ virus
US President Donald Trump visited the border with Mexico on Tuesday and claimed it had stopped both undocumented immigration and the coronavirus.
In the blazing heat, Trump briefly stopped to inspect a new section of the wall and scrawled his signature on the concrete and rebar structure.
Trump is looking to regain campaign momentum after a poor turnout for a weekend rally in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

23:00 GMT (Tuesday) – ‘We’ve been hit badly’: Fauci warns US on coronavirus surge
Dr Anthony Fauci has warned that the next few weeks will be critical in stamping out coronavirus hotspots around the US.
“We’ve been hit badly,” Fauci told a House committee, adding he was “really quite concerned” about rising community spread in some states, including Arizona, where US President Donald Trump was holding a rally on Tuesday and viewing the construction of a border wall.
Fauci, who also stressed that testing would be stepped up, was speaking at the committee along with the heads of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Food and Drug Administration, and a top official at the Department of Health and Human Services.
Find out more about what they had to say here.

Dr Anthony Fauci testifies before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce on the COVID-19 pandemic [Kevin Dietsch/Pool via AP Photo]

Hello and welcome to Al Jazeera’s continuing coverage of the coronavirus pandemic. I’m Kate Mayberry in Kuala Lumpur.
You can read all the updates from yesterday (June 23) here.
Continue Reading…

Anthony

Anthony Fauci: No reason why we shouldn’t be able to vote in person

Dr. Anthony Fauci said it should be safe for people to vote in person as long as they take sufficient precautions. “I think if carefully done according to the guidelines, there’s no reason that I can see why that not be the case,” Dr. Fauci told National Geographic in an interview that aired Thursday. He…

Anthony Fauci: No reason why we shouldn’t be able to vote in person

Dr. Anthony Fauci said it should be safe for people to vote in person as long as they take sufficient precautions.

“I think if carefully done according to the guidelines, there’s no reason that I can see why that not be the case,” Dr. Fauci told National Geographic in an interview that aired Thursday.

He pointed out that grocery stores have marks intended to keep people at least six feet apart.

“You can do that,” said Dr. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases. “If you go and wear a mask, if you observe the physical distancing and don’t have a crowded situation, there’s no reason why you shouldn’t be able to do that.”

He said people who are at higher risk or don’t want to take the chance can have a vote-by-mail option.

“There’s no reason why we shouldn’t be able to vote, in person or otherwise,” he said.

Dr. Fauci’s comments came as Democrats and President Trump are locked in a stalemate over funding for the U.S. Postal Service.

Democrats had pushed for $25 billion for the post office and $3.5 billion for vote-by-mail efforts, though it appeared that negotiators had settled on $10 billion for USPS in the most recent round of negotiations.

Democrats, who have effusively praised Dr. Fauci throughout the course of the pandemic, say the additional money is necessary so people don’t have to risk their health by going to the polls in person.

Mr. Trump said Thursday that near-universal vote-by-mail isn’t going to work without that additional money, which is holding up broader negotiations on the next coronavirus relief package.

White House press secretary Kayleigh McEnany called Democrats’ $3.5 billion ask for vote-by-mail “fundamentally unserious.”

Sign up for Daily Newsletters

Continue Reading…

Continue Reading

Anthony

Dr. Anthony Fauci says photo of him without a mask at baseball game is ‘mischievous’

Dr. Anthony Fauci, who has been advising President Trump’s coronavirus task force, came under scrutiny when a photo of him surfaced at a baseball game Thursday not wearing a mask, but sitting close to two people. Dr. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has been encouraging the public to wear…

Dr. Anthony Fauci says photo of him without a mask at baseball game is ‘mischievous’

Dr. Anthony Fauci, who has been advising President Trump’s coronavirus task force, came under scrutiny when a photo of him surfaced at a baseball game Thursday not wearing a mask, but sitting close to two people.

Dr. Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, has been encouraging the public to wear masks to stop the spread of the coronavirus pandemic.

He threw out the first pitch at the Washington Nationals’ game on Thursday, but a photo of him in the stands with his wife and a friend caught the attention of some reporters. They were not socially distanced, and he had his mask pulled down.

Yasher Ali, a contributor to New York Magazine and Huffington Post, tweeted out the photo, saying the doctor should set a better example. He has since deleted his tweet.

But Dr. Fauci pushed back on the critics Friday on Fox News, saying he was dehydrated and was drinking water. He also noted he tested negative for the coronavirus hours before.

“I was drinking water trying to rehydrate myself,” Dr. Fauci said.

“I wear a mask all the time when I am outside,” he added. “If people want to make something about that they can, but to me, I think that is mischievous.”

Dr. Fauci also predicted there will be a vaccine for COVID-19 by the end of the year or early 2021.

He has come under scrutiny from critics that say Dr. Fauci has been wrong about the virus a number of times. At first, he said masks were not necessary and also suggested travel from China should not have been halted. Since then, he has reversed his position on both issues.

Mr. Trump has even described his adviser, Dr. Fauci, as “an alarmist.”

The president has been critical of masks, saying advisers first said they were not needed but now are saying they should be mandatory. He has since said he will wear one in public when he cannot socially distance after coming under scrutiny by the media for not setting an example for Americans.

Many localities are mandating masks be worn in public — even outside, not just indoors. Washington, D.C., Mayor Muriel Bowser implemented her strict mask mandate earlier this week, only allowing for minor exemptions such as children under 2 years old and people engaging in exercise outdoors.

Sign up for Daily Newsletters

Continue Reading…

Continue Reading

Anthony

Anthony Fauci fears 100,000 U.S. coronavirus cases a day

The government’s disease fighters told Americans on Tuesday to wear masks and take “personal responsibility” for stamping out the pandemic, warning the nation is heading in the wrong direction as hospitalizations rise in a dozen states and Arizona sees more deaths per day. Dr. Anthony Fauci, who leads infectious disease research at the National Institutes…

Anthony Fauci fears 100,000 U.S. coronavirus cases a day

The government’s disease fighters told Americans on Tuesday to wear masks and take “personal responsibility” for stamping out the pandemic, warning the nation is heading in the wrong direction as hospitalizations rise in a dozen states and Arizona sees more deaths per day.

Dr. Anthony Fauci, who leads infectious disease research at the National Institutes of Health, warned that the country could have an eye-popping 100,000 new cases per day if Americans keep flouting social distancing rules.

“We’re now having 40-plus thousand new cases a day,” Dr. Fauci told the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor and Pensions. “I would not be surprised if we go up to 100,000 a day if this does not turn around. So I am very concerned.”

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, meanwhile, said Americans should “embrace the universal use of face coverings” as cases surge across the Sun Belt.

“Specifically, I’m addressing the younger members of our society, the millennials and the Generation Zs. I ask those that are listening to spread the word,” Dr. Robert R. Redfield said, as governors warn that young people are packing into bars and flouting safety guidelines.

Dr. Redfield said he is disappointed with airlines that plan to fill their planes to capacity in violation of social distancing guidelines, which call for 6 feet of physical separation. He said the agency is reviewing the situation.

“We don’t think it’s the right message,” he testified at the same hearing.

Members of Mr. Trump’s coronavirus task force sounded the alarm as the European Union extended its ban on American travelers while opening its borders to visitors from more than a dozen other countries, including Canada.

The U.S. is recording tens of thousands of new infections per day, as states like Florida, Texas and California report a summertime surge amid their attempts to reopen businesses and institutions.

The rate of those testing positive is increasing in hot spots, leading experts to worry that the disease is rampant. The nationwide death toll, meanwhile, has reached 126,000.

“Despite what President Trump says, this pandemic is not fading — far from it,” said Sen. Patty Murray, Washington Democrat.

Arizona’s rolling average for daily deaths jumped to 35 this past week compared with 21 the week before, according to data tracked by The Washington Post. Gov. Doug Ducey, a Republican, late Monday ordered bars, gyms, movie theaters and water parks to close for at least 30 days.

Governors in over a dozen states have paused reopening plans or closed bars to try to reverse concerning trends. New York and New Jersey are rethinking plans to allow indoor dining again, citing bad experiences in other states and their desire to avoid another crisis after getting slammed early on.

“Bars — really not good, really not good. Congregation in a bar, inside, is bad news,” said Dr. Fauci, the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

He said governmental safety recommendations should be seen as a means for getting back to normal rather than top-down directives.

“We shouldn’t look at the public safety health measures as an impediment to opening up. We should look at them as a vehicle to opening up,” Dr. Fauci said.

Committee Chairman Lamar Alexander, Tennessee Republican, said Mr. Trump, who hasn’t used the bully pulpit to encourage mask-wearing, should lead the way by wearing a mask at least once in a while.

“The president has millions of admirers. They would follow his lead,” Mr. Alexander said.

Former Vice President Joseph R. Biden, who is likely to face Mr. Trump in the November election, held up a mask as he spoke to reporters in Wilmington, Delaware.

“Wear a mask. It’s not just about you,” Mr. Biden said. “It’s about your neighbors, it’s about your colleagues, it’s about keeping other people safe. … It may be inconvenient, it may be uncomfortable, but it’s the right thing to do as an American.”

A Goldman Sachs analysis released Tuesday said a national mask mandate would slow transmission enough to replace “renewed lockdowns that would otherwise subtract nearly 5%” from gross domestic product.

Masks and social distancing techniques are considered society’s main tools for preventing the virus’ spread as scientists work on a vaccine.

Dr. Fauci said there is “no guarantee” that an effective vaccine will be developed, but he is cautiously optimistic that doses will be available by early next year.

In the meantime, Mr. Alexander said, it will be critical to help schools and colleges looking to reopen this fall.

“The question before the country today is not about whether to go back to school or college or child care or work, but how to do it safely,” he said. “Even though COVID-19 has not, in general, hurt young children and college-age students nearly as much as older or more vulnerable Americans, there is some health risk. But in my view, the greater risk is not going back to school.”

Dr. Fauci said the ability to open schools safely may depend on the situation in each district.

“If we adhere to guidelines about physical distancing, use of masks, that will help keep the level of infection in the community down,” he said. “That will make it easier to get children back to school.”

Sen. Rand Paul, Kentucky Republican, said there is no evidence that schools fuel the spread of the coronavirus. In lengthy remarks, he railed against “central planning” and “political correctness” in evaluating and responding to the virus.

“All I hear from you, Dr. Fauci, is, ‘We can’t do this, we can’t do that,’” Mr. Paul said.

Dr. Fauci said he feels “very strongly” that children should get back into school. He also said experts are forced to offer recommendations based on limited data and that he isn’t telling sports leagues they cannot play. Rather, he said, he has been outlining facts about the virus before player associations and others decide whether to proceed.

“Thank you,” Mr. Paul said. “We just need more optimism.”

⦁ Dave Boyer contributed to this report.

Sign up for Daily Newsletters

Continue Reading…

Continue Reading

Trending